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River Creek Blog: Dialogues of Discovery

The next lecture at the Janelia Campus of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute is scheduled for Sept. 27 at 7 p.m. Dr. Manu Prakesh, professor of bioengineering at Stanford University will deliver a lecture on the work underway by his research group.

Ladies Night Out in Purcellville!! Friday Night Only!!

Brambleton Ribbon Run/Walk 5k This Saturday!

It’s not too late to register for the Brambleton Ribbon Run/Walk 5k this Saturday. Although online registration closed today, Race Day Registration will be available from 7:00 – 7:50 a.m. at the Brambleton Town Center, near the movie theaters. If you’re not able to participate, please show the Brambleton spirit by cheering the runners and walkers along the route! Or, stop by and take advantage of some of post-race activities including a moonbounce for kids, crafts provided by The Children’s Science Museum, FREE health screenings by INOVA, Spring Boutique and more! For a schedule of events and course map, visit: http://www.brambletonribbonrun.vpweb.com

Daffodil Ball this coming Saturday at River Creek

Contact: Sherri Anderson
Community Outreach Coordinator
Capital Hospice \ Leesburg Office
703- 669-5248

DAFFODIL BALL TO BENEFIT CAPITAL HOSPICE
SATURDAY, MARCH 20, 2010
RIVER CREEK CLUB

March 10, 2010…The Sixth Annual Daffodil Ball, a benefit for Capital Hospice, will be held at the River Creek Club on Saturday, March 20. Anyone wishing to receive an invitation to this black tie event may contact Sherry Anderson at Capital Hospice, Leesburg Office at 703-669-5248 or by email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Co-chairs of the event are Cathy Odom and Deborah Welch.

The Daffodil Ball is a classic example of socially conscious citizens coming together and pitching in for a common cause. It started with a group of River Creek friends getting together with an “idea.” Each year the ‘Committee’ has consisted of over 100 volunteers who have sought sponsors, contributed time and money, arranged the decorations in the dining room at the clubhouse, handled the publicity, prepared and sent out invitations, and generally gave themselves unstintingly to make the Daffodil Ball the success it has been each year.

All monies raised will be used for the new inpatient clinic. Thanks to Al Van Metre and the Van Metre family, land was donated near Route 50. Once the land was donated, it was agreed that all the contributions from the Daffodil Ball would go directly to the building fund. There will be memorial gardens for the grounds of the Center which will be funded exclusively by the Daffodil Ball. The past five Daffodil Balls contributed more than $1.3 million towards the new clinic.

The new facility will have three wings of seven rooms each with patios and a kitchen for each wing in addition to professional offices totaling 42,000 square feet. The estimated cost is $15 million. Construction will take approximately one year to complete and will commence once the permit process is complete.

Capital Hospice is a non profit organization that serves end of life patients. On any given day Capital Hospice takes care of 900 patients under the Hospice wing primarily in the patients’ own homes. Hospice care is available to any and all terminally ill patients regardless of race, creed, age, or ability to pay. An interdisciplinary team of Hospice professionals including doctors, psychologists, nurses, pastors and counselors comprise the resources when regular medical treatment can no longer sustain the life of a patient.

The St. Baldrick’s Celebration

You’ll be seeing a couple of newly-shaved heads in the neighborhood this week, thanks to the Fairfax County Police Association’s annual St. Baldrick’s Foundation fundraiser.

Fairfax County police officers Kirk McNickle of Cascades and Chris Lincoln of CountrySide have signed up for time in the hot seat on March 19 to get their heads shaved to raise money for the war against childhood cancer. The two are members of a St. Baldrick’s team known as the McLean Sheepdogs, a group mostly made up of members of the same police squad based in northwest Fairfax County.

The St. Baldrick’s Foundation grew out of a challenge 10 years ago among friends at a St. Patrick’s Day celebration in New York City. Today, the foundation has become the world’s largest volunteer-driven fundraiser for pediatric cancer research. Currently, the organization provides more in childhood cancer research grants than any group other than the U.S. government.

“Cops love kids,” McNickle, the Sheepdogs' team captain, said as he talked about the police department’s support for the project. This year marks his fourth visit to the St. Baldrick’s chair.

“It’s a fantastic idea and it’s so easy,” he told me.

The only discomfort he experienced lasted very briefly the first time his head was shaved. “It wasn’t that bad,” he said, “but it was a little cold.”

McNickle has noticed that some folks can be what he calls “hair particular.”

“It’s funny to see how possessive they are of their hair, even those who don’t grow much hair,” he said.

The recipient of three awards for valor, McNickle is not at all worried about the temporary hair loss. “It’s just hair. It grows back,” he said with a laugh.

And what does Mrs. McNickle think about the project and her temporarily bald husband?

“I think it’s great,” Cathy McNickle said.

“For anybody who’s willing to shave their head, it’s an easy way to raise money for children’s cancer research. No donation is too small,” she added.

The McNickles are grateful to everyone supporting the McLean Sheepdogs’ challenge. The donations range in size from spare change collected in a jar to a sizeable offering provided by local businessman Steve Gotschi, president of DryHome Roofing & Siding Inc. of Sterling.

You can help Kirk McNickle, Chris Lincoln and the McLean Sheepdogs in the fight against childhood cancer. To join in the team’s fundraising efforts, go to http://www.stbaldricks.org, click on Find a Participant, select the Team option, type in McLean Sheepdogs and hit the Search button. You will be directed to a link to the team’s fundraising project.

You can also donate by phone by calling 888-899-BALD (888-899-2253). To make sure your donation is credited to the team, mention the McLean Sheepdogs’ i.d. number, 66709.

Get Your Girl Scout Cookies!!

If you happen to be driving over to the Brambleton Town Center, stop and support Brambleton Girl Scout Service Unit 70-1. They will be at several locations through March 28th, including Caribou Coffee on Sat/Sun mornings, Go Bananas on Sat/Sun afternoons, and by Fox Cinemas on Friday evenings, and Sat/Sun afternoons.

On Friday, March 19th, the scouts will be at the movie theatres for the opening of Diary of a Wimpy Kid. They will be accepting donations for SHARE, which is:

Share Her Annual Real Expenses annual giving campaign support:

• Ongoing programs for girls;
• Training for adult volunteers;
• Publications for girls, parents and volunteers;
• Financial assistance to ensure that all girls have the opportunity to participate in Girl Scouting; and
• Property insurance and maintenance for our seven area camps.

For more information about cookies or Girl Scouting in the Brambleton area, please contact Theresa Gothard SUM 70-1 .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Free Safety Shred at the Brambleton Town Center

The Brambleton Town Center is hosting a free Safety Shred on Saturday, March 20th from 10:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. in the Chevy Chase Bank parking lot. Radio Station 92.5 WINC will be broadcasting live throughout the event and participants can receive coupons and other giveaways from the BTC tenants.  This is for individuals only (no businesses/offices) and the limit is 10 boxes per person.

The Daffodil Ball for Capital Hospice

Contact: Sherri Anderson
Community Outreach Coordinator
Capital Hospice \ Leesburg Office
703- 669-5248

DAFFODIL BALL TO BENEFIT CAPITAL HOSPICE
SATURDAY, MARCH 20, 2010
RIVER CREEK CLUB

March 10, 2010…The Sixth Annual Daffodil Ball, a benefit for Capital Hospice, will be held at the River Creek Club on Saturday, March 20. Anyone wishing to receive an invitation to this black tie event may contact Sherry Anderson at Capital Hospice, Leesburg Office at 703-669-5248 or by email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Co-chairs of the event are Cathy Odom and Deborah Welch.

The Daffodil Ball is a classic example of socially conscious citizens coming together and pitching in for a common cause. It started with a group of River Creek friends getting together with an “idea.” Each year the ‘Committee’ has consisted of over 100 volunteers who have sought sponsors, contributed time and money, arranged the decorations in the dining room at the clubhouse, handled the publicity, prepared and sent out invitations, and generally gave themselves unstintingly to make the Daffodil Ball the success it has been each year.

All monies raised will be used for the new inpatient clinic. Thanks to Al Van Metre and the Van Metre family, land was donated near Route 50. Once the land was donated, it was agreed that all the contributions from the Daffodil Ball would go directly to the building fund. There will be memorial gardens for the grounds of the Center which will be funded exclusively by the Daffodil Ball. The past five Daffodil Balls contributed more than $1.3 million towards the new clinic.

The new facility will have three wings of seven rooms each with patios and a kitchen for each wing in addition to professional offices totaling 42,000 square feet. The estimated cost is $15 million. Construction will take approximately one year to complete and will commence once the permit process is complete.

Capital Hospice is a non profit organization that serves end of life patients. On any given day Capital Hospice takes care of 900 patients under the Hospice wing primarily in the patients’ own homes. Hospice care is available to any and all terminally ill patients regardless of race, creed, age, or ability to pay. An interdisciplinary team of Hospice professionals including doctors, psychologists, nurses, pastors and counselors comprise the resources when regular medical treatment can no longer sustain the life of a patient.

Hypothermia Project, Stitching Olympics

Hypothermia project: As their neighbors prepared to ride out “the snowstorm of the century,” the members of Girl Scout troop 4717 of Potomac Falls decided to launch a community service project designed to help those most in need as the snow fell.

The six scouts in the troop working on Girl Scout Silver Award projects—Amanda, Annie, Tessa, Nicole, Alexandra and Saloni—contacted a nearby hypothermia shelter, developed a meal plan and menu, made and distributed flyers requesting food donations and prepared and delivered food to the shelter. Additional food preparation assistance was provided by troop members Kiana, Brittany and Markie. All of the girls are in the eighth grade at either Seneca Ridge or River Bend middle school.

The scouts collected food supplies from their neighbors, families and friends. In addition, some of the girls raised money for the ingredients by babysitting and handling other chores. Once the final donations arrived, the scouts prepared containers of pasta and sauce, containers of salad and batches of cookies.

Troop co-leader Nikki Haas said the scouts were disappointed at first when they learned that they were too young to serve meals at the community shelter (servers must be 18 years of age). But, after some thought, the girls realized that they could participate in the dinner experience by cooking the food for the shelter’s residents. It was important to them to do more than just deliver groceries to the shelter.

The timing of the project couldn’t have been better. The scouts’ first dinner delivery took place the day before the initial big snowstorm hit. The next day, with the entire area snowed in, no food deliveries could be made and the troop’s donations were important menu items at the shelter. The scouts made a second delivery during the break between storms.

With help from their families and their community, the girls were able to provide food to more than 200 people staying at the Embrey Rucker Community Shelter in Reston during some of the most challenging winter weather this area has ever seen.

Stitching Olympics: The CountrySide Quilters group held the closing ceremonies of its first Winter Stitching Olympics on Tuesday, March 2, as snow showers swept the area. During the session, awards were given to the top three winners in the Quilt Binding and Pillow Case Making events.

The Quilt Binding competition induced spirited stitching by Judy Moorman, Carol Oliveri, Karen Fry, Sarah Entsminger, Carol Haverfield and Pat Guenther. The gold and silver medals were decided by a difference of a mere 10 inches. Kristi Minnema earned the gold medal with 1,376 inches of quilt binding, Jane Coleman brought home the silver with 1,366 inches and Vicki Thompson took the bronze with 1,236 inches.

A total of six stitchers participated in the Pillow Case event, including Carol Oliveri, Carol Haverfield and Laura Fuller. The gold medal went to Cindy Paez for making 23 pillow cases. Jane Coleman earned a second silver medal with nine pillow cases and Karen Fry took the bronze with six pillow cases.

The 48 pillow cases made during the competition will be donated to the Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter as part of the CountrySide Quilters’ participation in “McCall’s Quilting” magazine’s Million Pillow Case Challenge.

Spring has sprung at North Fork

There may still be many snow banks along the roads and in the woods, but spring is finally making its way to North Fork.
Many of our local farmers say Mother Nature might have one last wallop for us, and the animals and trees tell us it might be so. The horses are slow to lose their winter coats, and the trees have not began budding in earnest. So at every chance we make sure we have plenty of feed, hay and stall bedding on hand.
With the great help of the VDOT folks at the St. Louis station our roads have stayed open. This week they dealt with a huge sink hole in front of the Maloneys' house on Shelburne Glebe Road's turn at Forest Mill. A lady in a fur coat with a brand new Mercedes was almost stuck there and ended up with a mud-covered luxury vehicle.

ONTO THE TRAILS AT LAST

We were hoping for great weather next weekend, but we could not be so lucky. Rain is predicted Wednesday right through Sunday. If we do ride, it will be between rainstorms with lots of mud. Our horses sre still winter barefoot until next week and probably will be better off shoeless.
As spring arrives, let's all try to ride together. We have a big riding community. I only walk and trot, so if you like to go at my leisurely pace, give me a call. Fuggie is 28 now and I am no spring chicken, and my new horse is going to take some time getting fit even at walk-trot, so we would love some company.

GETTING READY FOR CAMP

We are starting to plan the summer Woof 'n' Hoof asnd Fuin on the Farm camps through Loudoun Departrment of Parks, Recreation and Community Servivces. Thre week-long camps will be going into their 12th year, and we are proud to lead them. If you are a fafrmer and would like for us to include your fartm, please call me. If you have a suggestion for a destination in Loudoun or nearby, call me about that as well.
Sign up for camps will begin in April, so keep an eye on the http://www.loudoun.gov/prcs website.

South Riding is well represented at the Odyssey of the Mind State Competition

Three of our schools will be represented at the “Odyssey of the Mind” state championships on March 27th. For those unfamiliar, Odyssey of the Mind (OoTM) is offered as an after-school activity sponsored by school PTA’s. According to their official site, “OoTM teaches students how to think divergently by providing open-ended problems that appeal to a wide range of interests. Students learn how to identify challenges and to think creatively to solve those problems. They are free to express their ideas and suggestions without fear of criticism. The creative problem-solving process rewards thinking "outside of the box." While conventional thinking has an important place in a well-rounded education, students need to learn how to think creatively and productively.”

Mercer Middle School’s journey to states is being led by Wendy Kirwan and Laurie Wolfe. “Our Division II team placed first at the regional tournament on February 27th in the "Return to the Gift of Flight" problem. This problem asked the kids to exhibit six different kinds of flight plans, three of which had to be shown as different aircraft with different propulsion systems. Not an easy task! Plus they had to do it in a creative way: let's just say for them, "Time Flies"! The team members are Catie Hutchison, Ellie Hill, Sean Hernley, Will Kirwan, Michaela Miller, Elizabeth Donovan and Savannah Olson. The entire team are "Aldie Elementary Alumni" and have done Odyssey in the past: for five of them, this will be their second time at a State competition,” said Kirwan.


Little River Elementary School’s Division 1B, coached by Bill and Judy Munley, won first place for their solution to the “Food Court Problem.” “Team members are Michael Munley, Neil Smith, Siddhant Nalawade, Nitin Chetla, Ryan H., Noah Howell and Justin Sheehan. “Our team, known as the "Bushka Brothers," had top scores in all three categories. All team members are veterans of Odyssey of the Mind and 5 of them were a part of last year's Region 15 Championship team. They have learned invaluable skills in out of the box thinking, problem solving and team work,” stated Bill Munley.

A second team from Little River, the “Spectacular Seven,” won first place and a trip to states for their division as well. This team is led by Puneet Batheja and his team consists of Priya Batheja, Aashish Batheja, Carolani Bartell, Ruthvik Gajjala, Madeline Lanciani, Lydia Vlasto and Emmy Wood. Batheja says, “We won first place in the Regional Tournament for our presentation of the “Discovered Treasures” problem. The team learned creative problem-solving methods while having fun in the process - which indeed is the spirit of Odyssey.”

Hutchison Farm‘s winning team, led by Kim Stanley, presented a creative solution to the "Food Court" problem, where an "unhealthy food" was put on trial. The team members are Maria Togni, Madison DeMello, Christine Dang, Kate Nette, Erica Stanley, Matt Yorkilous and Kyle Cardone. “This was the first Odyssey of the Mind competition for six out of seven team members! The talented team of 4th graders used humor and unbridled imagination, combined with hard work and determination, to earn a victory in their first competition together. They discovered that with teamwork, great things are possible,” said Stanley.

We wish all of the teams good luck at states. More information and results will be posted on our blog.



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