Mobile Website | Login | Register
Staff Directory | Advertise | Subscribe | About Us
Business Government Politics Region Crime/Public Safety Education People E-edition Ashburn Hamilton Hillsboro Lansdowne Leesburg Lovettsville Middleburg Purcellville River Creek Round Hill Sterling
Basketball Football Youth Wrestling Gymnastics Swimming Volleyball Baseball Track Golf Cheer Cross Country Schedule Scores
Brambleton Community of Faith Hangin in the Nosebleeds Journal Entry Loudoun Essence Made in Loudoun Odd Angles River Creek & Lansdowne South Riding Sterling, Cascades & CountrySide
This Week's Slideshow Browse All Galleries Your Best Dish Featured Video The Virginians
  • Announcements
  • Autos
  • Jobs
  • Legals
  • Homes
  • YardSales
  • Submit an Ad
  • Website Development SEO and SEM Newspaper Advertising Online Advertising
    Classified listings Homes section

    Charter applicants face harsh criticism from opposition movement

    Block the Loudoun Math and IT Academy or “almighty God will hold you accountable for it,” one speaker told the School Board’s charter school Select Committee Monday.

    William Cook, a clergyman leading the Black Robe Regiment, an activist Christian organization, was among the many commenters opposed to the math & IT charter school being considered by the School Board.

    Cook referenced “Matthew 18:6” in the Bible, which says it would be better for those who would lead believers away from God to have a heavy millstone hung around the neck and be drowned in the sea than suffer God’s punishment.

    “It will be your neck around which the heavy millstone of retribution will inevitably be hung,” Cook said.

    Cook was told by committee chair Jeff Morse (Dulles) to end his testimony after delivering this proclamation.

    He alleged that the charter school was secretly being set up a Muslim religious school.

    His words were the harshest of the opposition movement’s to the charter school, which comprised most of the 18 speakers at the meeting that was held Nov. 19. The movement has been speaking at public hearings on the school since the application process began in August.

    The proposed school would serve grades six through 12 with a program emphasizing math and science, modeled after the Chesapeake Science Point Charter School (CSP) in Maryland, according to the school’s application.

    A phased-in enrollment process would have 192 students enroll in the first year, with a maximum capacity of 672 students by the sixth year. 

    The Select Committee is comprised of chair Jeff Morse (Dulles), Jill Turgeon (Blue Ridge) and Brenda Sheridan (Sterling), who remained silent throughout the meeting. The committee is tasked with either recommendation for or against the charter’s approval.

    Many of the speakers opposing the school focused on the theory that the school would be religious in nature, attempting to connect it with Turkish Muslim cleric Fetullah Gulen, who lives in self-imposed exile from Turkey in Pennsylvania.

    Gulen’s website states he is opposed to terrorism, cooperation between different religions, the compatibility of science and faith and democracy as the only viable form of government.

    Opponents allege that Gulen’s followers run more than a hundred charter schools in the United States, including CSP in Anne Arundel County and that the applicants are secretly Gulenists as well.

    Gulen said in a USA Today story he is not connected to the charter schools in any way. CSP and the applicants have also rejected the label.

    James Cha, a pastor at Open Door Presbyterian Church in Herndon, who said he taught in a Gulen charter school in Uzbekistan, said there were no religious teachings in the classrooms but efforts were made to recruit teachers to Gulen’s brand of Islam, which allegedly preaches teaching science as service to God.

    “There was recruitment for students into religious programs outside of the classroom,” Cha said. “Those who showed a lot of interest were actually taken to Turkey and trained in their religion and came back as jihadists.”

    Another major point of opposition to the charter was its connection to CSP, which is currently embroiled in a lawsuit with their county and on a temporary three-year charter.

    The applicants are seeking the help of two men previously involved in CSP: founder Ali Bacik and former principal Fatih Kandil.

    “It [CSP] is extensively flawed,” said Jo-Ann, one of the school’s largest critics and former House of Delegates candidate.

    Rachel Sargent, a former public school teacher, read from the Anne Arundel school system’s report on CSP, which said that the school failed to accommodate students with special needs, employed ineffective financial controls and accounting principles.

    “This is fact, this is what we have presented to you at many of the meetings before,” Sargent said. “It is important that we have a background about this.”

    The few speakers who spoke supporting the school defended its educational mission of more STEM and IT education for students and refuted the religious nature of the school.

    Mary Porter Green, the founder of Curiosity Zone, which teaches science at a pre-school level, said she was surprised the debate wasn’t about whether or not Loudoun needed more science programs.

    “It’s a school that will be open to all children, not just students with academic achievements,” Green said. “I think it would be really beneficial.”

    Mindy Williams, a partner with Access Point Public Affairs representing the applicants, said that the opposition movement’s claims were not factual.

    “Not all of the information that has been presented as fact is in fact, fact,” Williams said.

    Mustafa Sahin, one of the charter school applicants living Ashburn, spoke in defense of his proposed school.

    “This a public school and of course our religion is not going to be part of this teaching,” Sahin said. “We are of course going to be following the curriculum that is going to be in every public school’s curriculum.” 

    Sahin also commented on the hearing’s tone.

    “I wish we were able to introduce ourselves and let us know each other better in a friendly environment,” Sahin said. “But this is the platform that we have.”

    Morse acknowledged a large amount of passion from both sides of the issue and said that part of the committee’s job is to listen to a variety of arguments.

    “Our job is to take the emotion out and focus on the application,” Morse said.

    He said that he submitted several questions to the applicants that he hoped would be answered and lead to a more well-rounded debate at the public hearing this Thursday.

    “I just hope that people treat each other with professionalism and respect,” Morse said.

    The next two public hearings of the committee are scheduled for Nov. 29 and Dec. 6.

    Comments

    A follow-up comment from your friendly neighborhood “wing-nut” clergyman  in response to the comments of ‘Troy McClure,’ ‘Right Honorable,’ ‘The Operative,’ ‘Skid Row,’ and ‘Francis the Talking Mule:’  You know, I simply reminded School Board members of an historical and biblical warning to those who would make the fateful mistake of putting “stumbling blocks” in front of children—children whose welfare is often cited by politicians as inviolable justification for any number of new policies and programs—a “stumbling block” being anything that would hinder young’uns relationship with Jesus, the quoted source.  His warning was stern, consistent with the immeasurable value that He places on a human soul. As a clergyman whose views are informed by Scripture and fact, I have a moral duty to speak consistent with the facts and that worldview.  If I happen to be a “wing-nut,” as some have suggested, my right to speak remains, as does your duty to honor it. I didn’t insult school board members at the hearing. Some might even suggest that reminding them of Jesus’ warning was beneficent.  Among comments posted in response to Aaron Koepper’s article, however, are several that are ad hominem insults that betray substantial ignorance of the matter under debate. I based my statement at the hearing on Jesus’ words, not because the Bible is all that I know, or am any less knowledgeable than some of the other speakers about Muslim extremists’ highly-successful efforts to date to insinuate Islamic Law into the fabric of American society; quite the opposite.  As a long-time contract employee with the DHS Science & Technology Directorate’s Explosives Division and a systems engineer evaluating explosives detection technologies for the Transportation Security Administration, I have also devoted myself, on my own time, to learning everything there is to know about the ideology that inspires terrorism, terrorist movements, and Muslim extremists’ strategies for more than seven years.  I have learned that one of the most effective of those strategies has been what is known among Intel professionals as a Denial and Deception (D&D) operation, one that is now aided and abetted by operatives who have successfully penetrated many of the power and influence centers of our society.  Accordingly, because the “bad guys” have executed their D&D strategy so flawlessly,” many Americans continue to disbelieve that a problem exists, even when presented with a convincing case.  If you want to learn more visit www.understandingthethreat.com.  However, please be warned in advance that unless you want your world turned inside-out by taking in what is the equivalent of the “red pill” Morpheus’ gave Neo in the movie The Matrix, do not order the DVD.  With regard to the legitimacy of clergy having a substantive role in the civil discourse, take a few moments and watch the video available at brr-wallbuilders.com. May God bless you richly, each and every one, and may this Christmas be a blessed and memorable one for you and the people you love! —WHC


    A follow-up comment from your friendly neighborhood “wing-nut” clergyman in response to the comments of ‘Troy McClure,’ ‘Right Honorable,’ ‘The Operative,’ ‘Skid Row,’ and ‘Francis the Talking Mule:’  You know, I simply reminded School Board members of an historical and biblical warning to those who would make the fateful mistake of putting “stumbling blocks” in front of children—children whose welfare is often cited by politicians as inviolable justification for any number of new policies and programs—a “stumbling block” being anything that would hinder young’uns relationship with Jesus, the quoted source.  His warning was stern, consistent with the immeasurable value that He places on a human soul. As a clergyman whose views are informed by Scripture and fact, I have a moral duty to speak consistent with the facts and that worldview.  If I happen to be a “wing-nut,” as some have suggested, my right to speak remains, as does your duty to honor it. I didn’t insult school board members at the hearing. Some might even suggest that reminding board members of Jesus’ warning was beneficent.  Among comments posted in response to Aaron Koepper’s article, however, several are ad hominem insults and betray substantial ignorance of the matter under debate. I based my statement at the hearing on Jesus’ words, not because the Bible is all that I know, or am any less knowledgeable than some of the other speakers about Muslim extremists’ highly-successful efforts to date to insinuate Islamic Law into the fabric of American society; quite the opposite.  As a long-time contract employee with the DHS Science & Technology Directorate’s Explosives Division and a systems engineer evaluating explosives detection technologies for the Transportation Security Administration, I have also devoted myself, on my own time, to learning everything there is to know about the ideology that inspires terrorism, terrorist movements, and Muslim extremists’ strategies for more than seven years.  I have learned that one of the most effective of those strategies has been what is known among Intel professionals as a Denial and Deception (D&D) operation that is aided and abetted by operatives that have penetrated many of the power and influence centers in our society.  Accordingly, because this D&D strategy has been executed so flawlessly by the “bad guys,” many Americans continue to disbelieve that a problem exists, even when presented with convincing case.  If you want to learn more visit www.understandingthethreat.com.  However, please be warned in advance that unless you want your world turned inside-out by taking in what is the equivalent of the “red pill” Morpheus’ gave Neo in the movie The Matrix, do not order the DVD.  With regard to the legitimacy of clergy having a substantive role in the civil discourse, take a few moments and watch the video available at brr-wallbuilders.com. May God bless you richly, each and every one, and may this Christmas be a blessed and memorable one for you and the people you love! —WHC


    I attended the School Board meeting last night when this subject was again on the agenda. Two speakers pointed out that the applicants had met with the Board for in depth meeting to review their proposal while those opposed were only given 3 min. each to make their case. They asked the Board to consider allowing the opposition 15-30 min. to make the case against. Given that this proposal carries a $8 million ANNUAL price tag, that seems like a very reasonable suggestion to me and I hope the Board will make it happen.


    Thank you for accurately reporting my remarks at the hearing with one exception. I said “... Almighty God will hold you accountable for it,” not “the Almighty God ...” The statement was included in the following sentence: “If for any reason, you [the School Board] expose them [the children of Loudoun County] to content that might cause them to stumble, Almighty God will hold you accountable for it, regardless of your religious affiliation, even if you are an atheist.  Ignorance will be no sanctuary at your final exam and there will be no makeup test.” Lastly, I assure you that nothing I said at the hearing was anywhere near as harsh as reality will be for school board members who put stumbling blocks in front of children, when they finally give an account for it before Almighty God.


    Irrational people used to be swept to the side.  Hence the term “fringe”.  Now they are front and center and published in the local paper. 

    I guess I agree with him to a point though, I don’t want a publicly funded entity recruiting for Islam.  The difference is that I don’t want any of his religion being pushed in a public school either.  That is what “Sunday school” and private schools are for.


    I bring readers’ attention to the below article dated 13 November 2012 at Front Page Magazine.  Loudoun County School Board members should be doing their homework, and so should the public, instead of reacting to an article in the Loudoun Times, which has failed to do any substantive and objective research on the Gulen Movement.  There are several articles at FP on the Gulen Movement, which has been under federal investigation by the FBI and the Department of Education since 2011.

    Excerpt from the below article:  “Last month in Loudoun, VA, applicants behind the proposed Loudoun Math and IT Academy in that city were peppered with questions from residents who were concerned that the proposed charter has ties to the Gülen Movement. Access Point Public Affairs’ Mindy Williams, who serves as the spokeswoman for the charter school applicants, along with School Board Vice Chairman Jill Turgeon and Board of Supervisors Vice Chairman Janet Clarke, were met with a great amount of skepticism when they said they believed the school was not tied to Gülen or his movement. “I do think it’s very important that we’re absolutely sure there is no connection,” Clarke said, “but in all fairness, we can’t draw that connection when we don’t know quite yet.”

    “Perhaps they’re not looking hard enough. At an earlier meeting, it was pointed out that Ali Bicak is one of the founding members of Chesapeake Science Point in Maryland, which has alleged ties to the Gülen Movement and is ostensibly the school after which the Loudoun Math and IT Academy is modeled. Fatih Kandil, listed as an applicant for the Loudoun charter school, is a former principal of Chesapeake Science Point and was the director of the Horizon Science Academy in Ohio, which has also been accused of ties with Gülen. “There’s a trend here I’m hoping you see,” said meeting attendee Rachel Sargent.”

    Here is the full text of the FP Magazine article:

    Pushing Back Against Stealth Jihad Charter Schools
    By Arnold Ahlert
    FrontPage Magazine, November 13, 2012

    Americans may not realize it yet, but Turkey’s regression from a secular democracy into an Islamic state may be based on an educational movement that has also taken root in America. Imam Fethullah Gülen and his Gülen Movement (GM) have had enormous influence in setting the increasingly Islamist agenda of Turkey’s ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP). Much of this is due to GM’s vast empire of media entities, financial institutions, banks and business organizations. But the most critical component of this empire is educational institutions. In Turkey, 75 percent of the nation’s two million preparatory school students are enrolled in Gülen institutions. In America, GM runs the largest charter school network in the nation. Such an empire is slowly receiving the kind of scrutiny–and pushback from concerned Americans–that it deserves.

    The principals and school board members of GM charter schools are primarily Turkish men. Hundreds of Turkish teachers have been admitted to the United States using H-1B visas, because the schools claim qualified Americans cannot be found. Moreover, an examination of federal tax forms and school documents reveals that GM charter schools tend to purchase a substantial portion of their goods and services from Gülenist businesses.

    This symbiotic relationship is occurring in many areas around the nation. For example, a trio of GM schools in Georgia are currently in the spotlight because they defaulted on a $19 million bond issue. An audit revealed the schools improperly granted hundreds of thousands of dollars in contracts for purchases like T-shirts, teacher training, and video production services from organizations with connections to school officials, or Gülen followers, or to businesses and groups with ties to the Gülen Movement. In some cases, bidding requirements were ignored. “I would just question how those vendors were selected when price in many instances wasn’t part of the decision making,” said Fulton County superintendent Robert Avossa.

    In Texas, similar allegations have been aimed at the Cosmos Foundation, a charter school operator founded a decade ago by a group of professors and businessmen from Turkey. The group, currently using the name Harmony Schools, has become the biggest charter operation in the state, and while its primary mission is educating schoolchildren, it has forged ongoing relationships with a close-knit network of businesses and organizations run by Turkish immigrants. Some of those founders, as well as school operators, and many of their business suppliers, are followers of Fethullah Gülen.

    Harmony receives more than $100 million a year in taxpayer funds. When questioned how that money was spent with regards to awarding contracts, Harmony produced a list showing that local American companies had been awarded only 13 construction and renovation jobs over several years. On the other hand, a New York Times review of contracts since January 2009, totaling 35 contracts and $82 million worth of work, revealed that all but 3 jobs worth about $1.5 million went to Turkish-owned businesses. Such contracts included an $8.2 million deal awarded to TDM Contracting to build the Harmony School of Innovation during the company’s very first month in business. Such “good fortune” is in direct contrast to established local companies that claimed they weren’t awarded contracts, despite bidding several hundred thousand dollars lower.

    One of those companies is Atlas Texas Construction and Trading, a Houston-based contractor with offices in Texas and Turkey. Atlas was awarded two contracts by Cosmos in Texas, the fairness of which was questioned by local contractors, who wondered why the company got both jobs when it was underbid by one company on one job, and four on the other.  Atlas showed up on a list of Gülen-affiliated companies in a 2006 cable from the American Consul General in Istanbul, released by WikiLeaks. In Louisiana, the New Orleans Times-Picayune reported that the Abramson Science & Technology Charter School in eastern New Orleans is linked to a bribe offer allegedly made by Inci Akpinar — the vice president of Atlas.

    Other possible sources of income for the GM movement were revealed in a 2011 report by the Philadelphia Inquirer. They revealed that the FBI is investigating a GM charter school employee kickback scheme, aimed at funding the larger GM movement.

    Operators of Gülen-based charter schools stress over and over that their charters hew to state-mandated curriculums. Yet in Inver Grove Heights, MN, a substitute teacher named Amanda Getz claims the Tarek Ibn Ziyad Academy (TIZA) maintained no separation between academics studied during school and Islamic studies afterward. She also claims she was instructed to take students in fours to the bathroom for “ritual washing” before lunch on Fridays (the Muslim holy day), after which, “teachers led the kids into the gym, where a man dressed in white with a white cap” led the students in Muslim prayers. She further revealed that while religious instruction is not part of the “school day,” most students stay after — perhaps because school buses don’t leave until the Islamic studies are over.

    Concerned Americans have begun to push back. In Austin, Texas, a protest rally was organized in August 2011 against the Harmony School of Political Science in that city. Rally organizer Donna Garner cited Fethullah Gülen’s influence in changing Turkey from pro- to anti-American, the link between Cosmos/Harmony/Atlas Construction in Texas and Louisiana’s Pelican schools, as well as concerns regarding how “teachers who can hardly speak English and are fresh from Turkey will present such historically significant elements as the Holocaust, the Founding Fathers, the Declaration of Independence, and the Constitution.”

    In Tennessee last May, Gov. Bill Haslam allowed a bill that limits the number of foreign workers at charter schools to become law without his signature. According to the bill, if a school wants 3.5 percent or more of its staff to be hired from among the foreign workers in the H1B or J-1 visa programs (with an exception for language teachers), it can now be refused a charter to operate by chartering authorities. American Muslim Advisory Council board member Sabina Mohyuddin from Tullahoma, labeled it “an anti-Muslim bill shrouded in anti-immigrant language.”

    Last month in Loudoun, VA, applicants behind the proposed Loudoun Math and IT Academy in that city were peppered with questions from residents who were concerned that the proposed charter has ties to the Gülen Movement. Access Point Public Affairs’ Mindy Williams, who serves as the spokeswoman for the charter school applicants, along with School Board Vice Chairman Jill Turgeon and Board of Supervisors Vice Chairman Janet Clarke, were met with a great amount of skepticism when they said they believed the school was not tied to Gülen or his movement. “I do think it’s very important that we’re absolutely sure there is no connection,” Clarke said, “but in all fairness, we can’t draw that connection when we don’t know quite yet.”

    Perhaps they’re not looking hard enough. At an earlier meeting, it was pointed out that Ali Bicak is one of the founding members of Chesapeake Science Point in Maryland, which has alleged ties to the Gülen Movement and is ostensibly the school after which the Loudoun Math and IT Academy is modeled. Fatih Kandil, listed as an applicant for the Loudoun charter school, is a former principal of Chesapeake Science Point and was the director of the Horizon Science Academy in Ohio, which has also been accused of ties with Gülen. “There’s a trend here I’m hoping you see,” said meeting attendee Rachel Sargent.

    There is also a trend of top charter school officials denying ties to GM or Fethullah Gülen, who has himself denied any association with these schools. A 2010 column by USA Today’s Greg Toppo debunks that claim. After noting the rise of charter schools “established over the past decade by a loosely affiliated group of Turkish-American educators,” and further noting that the school’s top administrators “say they have no official ties to Gülen,” and that “Gülen himself denies any connection to the schools,” he reveals that “documents available at various foundation websites and in federal forms required of non-profit groups show that virtually all of the schools have opened or operate with the aid of Gülen-inspired ‘dialogue’ groups, local non-profits that promote Turkish culture.”

    As previously reported, the most high profile news story about Gülen and the GM charter school operation was conducted by CBS’s “60 Minutes” last May. Despite their glowing story about a man “with millions upon millions of disciples who compare him to Ghandi and Martin Luther King,” and one who promotes “tolerance, interfaith dialog and above-all…education,” the network was forced to admit Gülen’s movement “does lack transparency: its funding, hierarchy, and ambitions remain hidden–leading our State Department to wonder in cables between Ankara and Washington if Gülen has an ‘insidious political agenda.’”

    America’s track record in determining whether certain well-connected Muslims have an “insidious political agenda” is not encouraging. In 2001, shortly after 9/11, the former imam for the Dar al-Hijrah mosque in Falls Church, VA was invited to the Pentagon as part of the military’s Muslim outreach efforts following the attacks. Ten years later, that man — Anwar al-Awlaki, leader of “Al Qaeda’s most active operational affiliate,” in the words of President Obama — was killed by a drone strike in Yemen. In 1999, Turkish television aired footage of Gülen delivering sermons to a crowd of followers:

    “You must move in the arteries of the system without anyone noticing your existence until you reach all the power centers … until the conditions are ripe, they [the followers] must continue like this. If they do something prematurely, the world will crush our heads, and Muslims will suffer everywhere, like in the tragedies in Algeria, like in 1982 [in] Syria … like in the yearly disasters and tragedies in Egypt. The time is not yet right. You must wait for the time when you are complete and conditions are ripe, until we can shoulder the entire world and carry it”

    Thirteen years later, it remains a real possibility that Fethullah Gülen and the GM believe conditions are “ripening” for their stealth jihad in America, using charter schools as their vehicle. Yet slowly but surely, more parents are becoming concerned about the kind of education their children are really getting, even as more journalists are beginning to look into the unsavory relationships — funded by taxpayer dollars — between these schools, and a network of Turkish-based businesses tied to the GM. More questions are also being asked about the possible exploitation of the H-1B visa system used to give Turkish nationals teaching jobs that might otherwise go to Americans. The time is right for a comprehensive investigation of the GM charter school system, and Imam Fethullah Gülen.


    Oh yes, the Loudoun zealots are showing their true colors.  This has nothing to do with Academia or the Charter School’s ability to foster a remarkable school, it has everything to do with Religion…<insert eye roll>.  I think it’s hypocritical that the “Black Robe Regiment” who is literally in bed with Patrick Henry College is attempting to hijack this charter school’s application. 
    Any person, especially a clergyman who uses a School Board meeting to espouse his ultra conservative religion beliefs should be considered as domestic terrorist.


    Xenophobes like the people reported on here—Cook, Cha, and this “Jo-Ann” name that drops into the middle of the story—should just go outside and bang rocks together for all they understand about knowledge, culture or science.  Do they realize that math comes from the Arabs, Persians, and others….not from Virginia.


    Readers should be doing their own research instead of merely reacting to this article.

    The Gulen charter school movement has been under Federal investigation by FBI and the Departments of Labor and Education since 2011.  “The investigation is centered around charter school employees who are allegedly engaged in kicking back part of their salaries to the Muslim movement also known as Hizmet (service to others), founded by Fethullah Gülen.”  (Front Page Magazine)

    Another issue is that “the Gülen schools are among the nation’s largest users of H1B visas, used to import foreign workers with technical skills to fill job shortages of qualified American workers.  Parents have alleged that certified, competent American teachers have been replaced at higher salaries by uncertified Turkish men who spoke limited English.  They claim that the schools discriminate against women and non-Turkish teachers and that Gülen teachers receive preferential treatment.” (Janet Levy @American Thinker))

    “Fethullah Gulen is a Turkish Islamic cleric who fled his native country in 1998, after being charged with seeking to overthrow the secular Turkish government. He currently lives in exile at a 28-acre mountain complex in the Pocono Mountains, with more than $25 billion of assets at his command. The 135 charter schools associated with the Gulen Movement (GM) enroll more than 45,000 students and comprise the largest charter school network in the United States — all of which are fully funded by American taxpayers. Fethullah Gulen has been under investigation by the government since 2011.

    “That investigation, carried out by FBI and the Departments of Labor and Education, is centered around charter school employees who are allegedly engaged in kicking back part of their salaries to the Muslim movement also known as Hizmet (service to others), founded by Gulen. Gulen initiated his movement in Izmir, a city on Turkey’s Aegean coast, more than 40 years ago, preaching impassioned sermons to his followers, who may now number as many as six million. In Turkey, the Gulen Movement has been accused of pushing for a hardline Islamic state.

    “If these schools are traditional American charter schools that do nothing more than “follow the state curriculum,” as Tansu Cidav, the acting CEO of the Truebright Science Academy in North Philadelphia contends, why is it necessary to hire foreign teachers and coordinate activities nationwide?

    “A federal document released in 2011 may provide the answer. It posits that Gulen’s charter schools may in fact be madrassahs, where students are “brain-washed” to serve as proponents of the New Islamic World Order Gulen purportedly seeks to create.”  (Front Page Magazine)


    Of course math and science has now been exposed as a liberal conspiracy. So this all makes perfect sense.


    Here we go again - the right wingnuts come out and stoke fear while the kids of Loudoun are robbed of an opportunity to become better, brighter and more competitive on the global stage.  Millstone???  Really?!?


    I guess we have to put up with these nuts who see no reason to separate church and state…but when they start trying to separate state and science, well, we’ve heard enough.


    William Cook might be upset to find out he learned how to count using Arabic Numerals (0 - 9).

    StayConnected

    Follow Us
    on Twitter

    News | Sports

    Like Us
    on Facebook

    News & Sports

    Join Our
    Email List

    Sign up for
    weekly updates
    The Loudoun Times-Mirror

    is an interactive, digital replica
    of the printed newspaper.
    Open the e-edition now.
    Get Our Headlines Via Email
    Tuesdays:  
    Thursdays: