Mobile Website | Login | Register
Staff Directory | Advertise | Subscribe | About Us
Business Government Politics Region Crime/Public Safety Education People E-edition Ashburn Hamilton Hillsboro Lansdowne Leesburg Lovettsville Middleburg Purcellville River Creek Round Hill Sterling
Basketball Football Youth Wrestling Gymnastics Swimming Volleyball Baseball Track Golf Cheer Cross Country Schedule Scores
Brambleton Community of Faith Hangin in the Nosebleeds Journal Entry Loudoun Essence Made in Loudoun Odd Angles River Creek & Lansdowne South Riding Sterling, Cascades & CountrySide
This Week's Slideshow Browse All Galleries Your Best Dish Featured Video The Virginians
  • Announcements
  • Autos
  • Jobs
  • Legals
  • Homes
  • YardSales
  • Submit an Ad
  • Newspaper Advertising Online Advertising
    Classified listings Homes section

    Live blog: Election Day morning, afternoon coverage

    Live blog continues here.

    2:30 p.m.

    Imitation not the highest form of flattery on Election Day
    By Hannah Hager, Times-Mirror Staff Writer

    An orange hat and glasses, while his signature uniform, does not entirely make the man that is Loudoun Board of Supervisor Eugene Delgaudio (R-Sterling).

    But it is these clothing items along with a bright orange shirt that one man is wearing to the polls in an effort to impersonate the supervisor. The man, whose true identity is unknown, has been introducing himself as Delgaudio throughout the Sterling precinct Nov. 8.

    “Isn’t it great?” the real Sterling supervisor Delgaudio said. “What a great compliment for me personally… It is the highest form of flattery. I’m touched, but I would prefer that he not stand in front of voters.”

    Delgaudio said the impersonator, which he encountered at Park View High School in Sterling, is using intimidation tactics to stop voters from going into the polling place. The supervisor said he asked the man to stop his impersonation and to also stop intimidating voters.

    “If it’s part of his schtick, that’s not funny. Intimidating voters is not Comedy Central,” Delgaudio said.

    Loudoun County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Kraig Troxell said a man was reported for campaigning against a candidate for political office just before 9 a.m. in Sterling. The deputies determined the man had not committed a violation, Troxell said. 

    Delgaudio added that the impersonator, who claims he is not from the area, was “paid to perform a political sabotage which has backfired.”

    To be Eugene Delgaudio, he said, “you have to be pleasant, sweet and genuinely funny.”

    2:16 p.m.

    At 1:30 p.m. Sully Elementary School (Precinct 701), reported a 12.7 percent turnout. At River Bend Middle School, it was reported that 328 votes had been cast. Forest Grove reports more than 15 percent turnout.

    Meanwhile, on the other side of the county in Lucketts, Jim Briggs, a volunteer at Lucketts Elementary School for the last six to eight years (and also the Republican Precinct Captain for Lucketts), said that at noon the precinct had 268-270 voters. That puts turnout at around 12 percent of registered voters, which he expects will double. Briggs said that turnout was 45-50 percent last year and 77 percent in 2008.

    “It will be very quiet now until around 4 or 4:30 when we’ll kick into a rush hour until 7 p.m.,” Briggs said.

    photoBrynn, 7, helps her mother, Ronna Schenk, put her ballot into the collection machine at approximately 1:46 p.m. at Lucketts Elementary School. Video still/Matt Vecchio
    photoMalcolm Baldwin, center, Democratic candidate for Catoctin District Supervisor, and Republican campaign volunteer Richard Churan approach Patricia Marrone as she gets out of her car to vote at Lucketts Elementary School Nov. 8. Times-Mirror Staff Photo/Beverly Denny

    1:50 p.m.

    Tom Marshall and Mark Nuzzaco were at Balls Bluff Elementary School in Leesburg at about 1:30 p.m. and the Times-Mirror caught them on video. The pair is running for the Leesburg School Board seat against Bill Fox.

    At voting precinct 508 in Leesburg – located at Balls Bluff Elementary School – turnout out is at 11.7 percent.

    “People just don’t care about local politics,” Celeste Kenny, chief election officer for voting precinct 508 said.

    Another voter came out and said she always votes, no matter if it’s just local elections.

    “I always vote, I never not vote,” she said. “All politics is local.”

     

     

    At Leesburg Community Church located on Lee Avenue, voter turnout is said to be low to moderate according to Barbara Elvin, a volunteer.

    “We got our mailman to come and vote,” Elvin said. “I don’t know what to expect.”

    She said that she’s worked at other voting sites that have been busier and she hopes for more people to come out after work but fears that turnout may dwindle due to the commute workers have to take to come to the polls after work.

    Wendy Webb, chief election officer for voting precinct 507 at the church also known as the Greenway district, said she is pleased with turnout.

    “We’ve had a steady flow of voters, we haven’t had much dead time,” Webb said. “The issues are bringing voters out and the publicity the candidates are putting forth are bringing voters. It’s important to have their voice heard and it has effect on their daily lives. It’s important to have a say in how things are run.”


    12:46 p.m.

    Voters are once again flocking to the poll locations around the county as the lunch hour continues. Voters in Round Hill are met with a slew of signs in the entryway of one of two locations in the town.

    photoRound Hill voters are met with an array of campaign signs at the entryway of one of two locations in the town. Times-Mirror Staff Photo/Hannah Hager

    12:06 p.m.

    Poll workers at Seldens Landing in Lansdowne reported a slow voter turnout around 11 a.m.

    More than 2,000 voters are registered in the precinct, but only 100 of them had cast a ballot by noon, according to precinct volunteer, Ann Bancroft.

    “It’s not a federal election, but you’d like it to be better,” Bancroft said.

    Meanwhile, voters turned out in droves at Belmont Ridge Middle School in Lansdowne where a steady line of people queued up in the hallway to cast their ballots.

    At least 536 voters had cast ballots by 11:45 a.m., said precinct volunteer, Lori Strathde.

    “We opened at 6 a.m. And it’s be a steady stream since we open the doors,” Strathde said. “It’s wonderful.”

    Not all election day proceedings have been without hiccups, however. Belmont Ridge Precinct Captain Anthony Fasolo said several precincts throughout the county reported glitches in their electronic voting machines this morning. Several machines were shut down around 8 a.m., during which time some precincts switched to paper ballots.

    Fasolo said he didn’t believe it would effect voting tallies at the end of the night.

    12:03 p.m.

    photoMary Blake performs her civic duty by submitting her ballot at Sanders Corner Elementary School in Ashburn Nov. 8. “It’s a privilege and every one should be doing it,” she said of the voting process. Times-Mirror Staff Photo/Beverly Denny

    11:58 a.m.

    School Board candidate gets rocky start to Election Day
    By Crystal Owens, Times-Mirror Staff Writer

    On Election Day the rules of what constitutes an emergency are different.

    Ashburn School Board candidate John Andrews found that out first hand this morning when a deer came crashing through the driver’s side window of his SUV while he was on his way in to the polls at 5 a.m.

    Andrews said he was at the intersection of Canoe Landing and Vestals Place, attempting to pull out into traffic when the accident happened.

    The crash left Andrews with cuts to his face, arm and hands. Rescue crews patched the candidate up and sent him him on his way from the scene, he said.

    “I declined [to go to the hospital] because I had to go to the polls,” Andrews said. “A candidate is not going to miss an Election Day.”

    Andrews was seen on Tuesday in front of Belmont Ridge Middle School handing out fliers and shaking hands.

    The deer survived the crash and walked away, he said.

    photoThe inside of John Andrews’ SUV is littered with broken glass from his run-in with a deer the morning of elections. “I declined [to go to the hospital] because I had to go to the polls,” Andrews said. “A candidate is not going to miss an Election Day.” Times-Mirror Staff Photo/Crystal Owens
    photoSchool Board candidate John Andrews had a scare on his way to the polls after striking a deer, but was in good enough shape to converse with election volunteers and voters. Times-Mirror Staff Photo/Crystal Owens

    11:52 a.m.

    Government Reporter Crystal Owens snapped photos at precincts around Ashburn.

    photo15-year-old Ebony Williams accompanies her mother, Claudette Jebberies-Williams, to the polls at Belmont Ridge Middle School. “I’ve always grown up aware that we have the right to vote,” Jebberies-Williams said. “The biggest issue that brought me out is financial funding for schools.” Despite Ebony not being old enough to vote, her mom wanted to show her the process. Times-Mirror Staff Photo/Crystal Owens
    photoTurnout appears strong at Belmont Ridge Middle School, where voters had to wait in line. Times-Mirror Staff Photo/Crystal Owens

    11:40 a.m.

    Sheriff candidates Mike Chapman and Ron Speakman were at the polls in Purcellville, and Business Reporter Hannah Hager caught the candidates on video. The two candidates are running against incumbent SheriffSteve Simpson.

     

     

    11:15 a.m.

    Times-Mirror Chief Photographer Beverly Denny has snapped photographs all morning, here are some of her shots.

    photoTara Campbell of Ashburn gets checked in to vote by Harry Shubargo at Sanders Corner Elementary School in Ashburn Nov. 8. Shubargo says his volunteering to help at elections encourages his neighbors to vote because he’ll know if they don’t vote. Times-Mirror Staff Photo/Beverly Denny
    photoShawn Mitchell, the Democratic nominee for the new 13th District state senate seat, shakes hands with Democratic campaign volunteer Dale Dallaire of Aldie after voting at Eagle Ridge Middle School in Broadlands Nov. 8. Times-Mirror Staff Photo/Beverly Denny


    11:11 a.m.

    Just in Case: Forget where to vote? If so, check out your voting precinct here.

    10:40 a.m.

    The Times-Mirror ran into Malcolm Baldwin at the polls at Tolbert Elementary in the Catoctin District. Baldwin is running for the district seat on the Board of Supervisors against Geary Higgins, who was next door at Harper Park Middle School in Leesburg.

     

    “There’s no way to know who is going to win this election,” Baldwin said, comparing the race to a petri dish.

     

    An Election Officer at Harper Park Middle School in Leesburg, who elected to not be named, said her “guesstimate” was that upwards of 400 voters had come through the school, although she later admitted to be hesitant about quoting a number.

    9:53 a.m.

    Barbara Bayles-Roberts is out at the Ida Lee polls in Leesburg, educating residents on the question she proposed regarding changing Leesburg Town Elections to November (they are currently held in May). The Times-Mirror caught her on video.

     

    “I don’t want to be presumptuous and assume it’s going to pass,” Bayles-Roberts said. “I’m very nervous, but very excited. It’s up to those who vote.”

    9:47 a.m.

    Spotted:
    Malcolm Baldwin, candidate for Catoctin District Board of Supervisors, at Hamilton Baptist Church.
    Mike Chapman, candidate for Loudoun County Sheriff, at Emerick Elementary School.
    Ron Speakman, candidate for Loudoun County Sheriff, at Emerick Elementary School.

    While campaigning at Emerick Elementary School, Speakman was approached by a Purcellville voter who said she didn’t believe a candidate who is running for political office should
    illegally post campaign material on highway medians. He responded that Janet Clarke, candidate for the Blue Ridge District Board of Supervisors seat, had done the same.
    - Hannah Hager
    9:20 a.m.

    A Tale of Two Precincts: In Leesburg, the redistricting is creating some interesting results. At Tuscarora High School, Bruce Campbell told me that only six voters showed up between 6 and 8 a.m. A total of 14 people had voted by the time I left Tuscarora at around 8:45 a.m.

    “This is a result of the redistricting,” Campbell, there with his wife and son, said.

    Less than a half-mile away, at Ida Lee Park, voters were swarming in as the clock neared 9 a.m., and both Democrat Dave Butler and Republican Ken Reid were on hand to talk to voters beforehand.

    Reid is running for the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors against incumbent Democrat Kelly Burk.

     

    Butler is going up against Randy Minchew for Virginia Delegate of the 10th District.

     

    9:15 a.m.
    Transportation on the minds of voters in Blue Ridge, Catoctin

    By Hannah Hager
    Times-Mirror Staff Writer

    While the western end of Loudoun isn’t usually equated with traffic, the county’s transportation congestion problems were on the top of the minds of voters in the Catoctin and Blue Ridge Districts respectively. Cars streamed in and out of the polling place in Hamilton between 7 - 8 a.m. as Catoctin constituents placed their votes before heading east to work.

    One such voter, Hamilton resident David Roberts said his mind was on the transportation issues of Routes 7 and 28, roads he commutes on every day to get to his federal government job in Herndon. He did not say who received his votes, but added that he would like to see the local goverments start to send sample ballots to consituents’ homes one month ahead of election day so that more people can be educated about the issues.

    Hamilton resident Joylyn Hannahs backed up Roberts’ dismay of traffic congestion because her husband commutes to his job in Washington, D.C., from Hamilton. She said it drove her vote toward the Republican side of the ticket, adding that she cast votes for incumbents Jennifer Bergel, who is the candidate for the Catoctin District School Board and Loudoun County Sheriff Steve Simpson because she approves of what they have accomplished in office.

    In Purcellville, which is part of the Blue Ridge District, resident Vincent Walcott said he was concerned with the lack of progress the government is making. He said voters today are casting their ballots to make “pragmatic change.” He added that he did not believe many incumbents would retain their seats, especially in the Virginia races. Purcellville resident Bob Ware said he was voting Republican because he agreed with their stance on taxes.

    8:26 a.m.

    Also ran into Valdis Ronis’ daughter (and Field Director) Shanyn Ronis, who told me a little about the morning’s turnout.

     

    Headed out to see what’s going on around Leesburg now.

    8:10 a.m.

    Ran into Shawn Mitchell outside the Broad Run High School polls. He is running against Dick Black for the Virginia State Senate seat.

     

    The pre-workday turnout appears to be pretty strong for an off-year election, but we are still waiting for numbers to trickle in. At Broad Run High School, there were no computer ballots, voters instead bubbled in a paper ballot before sliding it into a collection machine.

    6 a.m.

    It’s 6 a.m. and early-bird voters are already penciling ballots across the county, as Nov. 8 is upon us. Heated races in the Sheriff’s Office and Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office, as well as Virginia Senate, Board of Supervisors and School Boars seats highlight an action-packed election season.

    Remember to check in with the Times-Mirror throughout the day for up-to-the-minute updates and media coverage from polling places across Loudoun. To participate in ongoing discussion, comment below, “like” the Loudoun Times on Facebook or use hashtag #ltmelection on Twitter.

    For last-minute information, view our Voter’s Guide.

     

    photoThis shot, taken around 7:30 a.m., captures voters heading to the polls at Broad Run High School as campaign supporters provide materials and sample ballots. Check inside for the latest coverage. Video still/Matt Vecchio
    photoTara Campbell of Ashburn gets checked in to vote by Harry Shubargo at Sanders Corner Elementary School in Ashburn Nov. 8. Shubargo says his volunteering to help at elections encourages his neighbors to vote because he'll know if they don't vote. Times-Mirror Staff Photo/Beverly Denny
    photoVoters fill out their ballots at Lucketts Elementary School Nov. 8. As of about 1 p.m., 276 people had voted at the location, which is more than 10 percent of the total of eligible voters in the precinct, according to poll workers. Times-Mirror Staff Photo/Beverly Denny
    Comments

    uggs Miquel ugg boots uk


    “Isn’t it great?” the real Sterling supervisor Delgaudio said. “What a great compliment for me personally… It is the highest form of flattery. Why then was the emergency email sent out by Eugene titled “Election Day Fraud alert”? It states “Be alert to the union-hired intimidation being ochestrated on my supporters. Call the police on any suspcious activity and report any acts of verbal abuse to the election officials at the polling place to remove any disruptive person attempting to stop you from voting today.
    A man was cautioned and warned at Park View High School to restrain himself from this awful behavior but this tactic may be continuing throughout the day.
    I have done what I can to prevent the verbal assault on all voters but the “free speech” and “political expression” crosses the line when protests like “Occupy Sterling” is in full swing.
    I don’t get how 1 guy is now “Occupy Sterling”.  Why is it stated “union-hired intimidation” if he doesn’t know who it is.  Why tell his supporters to call the police when the police had told him that the guy wasn’t doing anything illegal?
    There is a short video on youtube http://wn.com/Eugene_Delgaudio_Imposter


    No for school bonds, yes for public safety.  Why is it the school system can campaign for their bond, but there was NO campaigning for public safety, which is the single most important responsibility of government.


    LCPS has been a poor steward of our finances and needs some “tough love” to get back on the right path before our property taxes go up even more.  Today’s bond is tomorrow’s tax increase.  Vote NO on the bonds


    Voting YES for the school bonds means that critically needed new schools can be built for the children aging into and through our school system.  These schools HAVE to be built and this money has to be spent.  Going with the bonds is a great way to spread the cost of purchasing the land and building the schools over years instead of an upfront payment.  VOTE YES for the schools bond.


    Should be pointed out that the Delgaudio imposter, while obnoxious, wasn’t breaking any laws or preventing people from entering.

    It was more like he was acting like a jerk and trying to pin it on Delgaudio.


    Thanks Nancy for setting up Freedom Highschool at 5:30am!  cold!!!


    Two “No” votes for schools came from my household.  It does not mean I do not support our schools it means that I do not believe that throwing more and more money at them is the most intelligent solution to the problem.


    I just cast my vote for Dick Black!


    If LCPS didn’t waste so much money, we’d have the funds for the schools.  But they do, and we don’t.  And then they call for more money…for the kids.  Not for their inept administration, or Promethean white boards, or putting an iPad in everyone’s hand.  Little Johnny will not be in the street if we vote down the bond.  They will have to have individual public hearings on each school and the public will get greater input into the costs v. spending.  It’s a no-brainer: vote NO.


    I voted YES on the school bonds.  I’m sorry to see that others don’t support our schools and would rather we have overcrowding.  Should more be done to make sure schools are more affordable in the first place? (like switching to 2-story plans)  Yes, but just because mistakes were made in the past doesn’t mean we should stick it to our kids now and in the future.  This county is one of the fastest-growing in the country.  We can’t support that growth with the current education infrastructure.


    +1 to Donna McLean’s comment


    Maybe the imposter was Stevens Miller.  But that would mean he’s done being the groupie for Ken Reid, and is not shifting to another “star.”  What does Stevens Miller’s wife think about all of this?


    I voted NO on the school bonds as did the others I talked to.


    Remember, Vote NO on the school bonds!


    This is getting weirder. I just checked back to Nevarez Facebook page, and the reference to the Eugene imposter has now been deleted.


    This is going to sound like an odd question, but did anybody see an imposter at some of the Sterling polling places claiming to be Eugene Delgaudio? I heard about it this morning and saw a reference to it on Al Nevarez’s Facebook page (Al4Sterling,) but have yet to get it from a first-hand source. It sounds bizarre, but given this particular race, even the most most bizarre claims tend to pan out.


    A union operative working for Sterling District Supervisor Democrat nominee and union official Alfonso Nevarez has been captured on tape dressed up as and insisting he is Eugene Delgaudio, while harassing and obstructing voters at Park View High School. 

    Sheriff’s deputies had to be called. 

    Union official Alfonso Nevarez, in a Daily Kos post titled “Come Join Us For Lunch - And Get Arrested!,” once wrote “Some of us might not need a good reason to break the law.”


    Yes Pamela because lower taxes and lower toll roads will definitely lead to better transportation.  Apparently both you and Dick Black believe in the transportation fairy


    Hummm…Pamela….Didn’t even see a whisper of mention of JOB CREATION in your Dick Black praises… those of us in the east who finally erradicated this wing-nut, wager that he will be all about decreeing death sentences on women with etopic pregnancies and PID with legislation like the extreme Mississippi bans.  This loser never solved any problems in the east, probably won’t in the west either.


    I cannot wait to say Senator Dick Black!  I look forward to having back in Richmond to fight for lower taxes, lower toll road fees, better transportation, protecting our 2nd Amendment rights, pushing for energy independence and school choice.


    PLEASE PLEASE- vote NO for Kuester, we need to perserve our clean reputation -don’t need DRAMA.


    Where’s Stevens Miller.  You know him, he’s the one always coming up in the rear of Ken Reid.  I can’t believe that Ken Reid can actually make it through the day without his groupie, Stevens Miller.  Oh for the day that Stevens Miller is out of politics.


    Yeah, LTM, get in those references to people voting for your buddy Steve Simpson!!!  Do you guys own stock in Nine Iron too?


    Hey Shawn—-  No Senate Seat 4 U. Dick Black is the projected winner of the 13th..  :)


    Thank you, Matt, for being on the job bright and early.

    Get Our Headlines Via Email
    Tuesdays:  
    Thursdays:

    StayConnected

    Follow Us
    on Twitter

    News | Sports

    Like Us
    on Facebook

    News & Sports

    Join Our
    Email List

    Sign up for
    weekly updates
    The Loudoun Times-Mirror

    is an interactive, digital replica
    of the printed newspaper.
    Open the e-edition now.

    Loudoun Business Journal - Summer 2014

    Loudoun Business Journal - Spring 2014