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    Leesburg mulls new parking measures

    The Town of Leesburg may be bidding adieu to the parking meters that litter the streets of downtown.

    Parking was a hot topic at the Feb. 23 Town Council work session, with topics ranging from in-lieu parking to parking meters.

    Town council was amicable about the prospect of replacing downtown's parking meters with digital kiosks, used in other jurisdictions throughout the country. Running from $8,000 to $15,000 is price, the kiosks are digital, automatic payment methods that usually take both credit and cash payments.

    "The reason the toll goes up is to pay for the toll workers. It's almost the same for our parking meters,” said council member Thomas Dunn "I'd like to see us remove the parking meters go with one parking meter per block."

    “I think going with automative systems is going to be much more cost effective.”

    Given kiosks on each block, town staff estimated each kiosks would be $10,000 each, but question whether there are enough parking spots to justify spending money on the kiosks.

    Much of the work session's conversation involved “in-lieu parking,” the fee developers pay when they are unable to provide the requisite parking. Currently, the rate is set at $3,000 per spot the developer doesn't provide, to be put in a town parking fund, which currently has around $200,000.

    The Town Council has proposed upping the amount to the tune of $20,000 per space, a fee they feel better reflects the Town's cost of providing parking.

    The Economic Development Committee will evaluate the new proposals in the coming weeks.

    The Town Council also discussed the need for more succinct and visible signing for parking.


    Comments

    These fancy new meters are not free.  You pay for a cellular data service, licensing for the software and fees for processing the payments.  I’d be curious if “old tech” would beat new tech in the long run.


    HAHAHAHA - he said, “The reason the toll goes up is to pay for the toll workers. It’s almost the same for our parking meters,”  What a funny statement.  The tolls only go up to pay for other things, but not the workers.  I have not once heard that as a reason for tolls going up.  And “almost the same” is saying it is not the same.  There must be a class on this stuff, like How to Trick the Public 101 or something like that.


    Why can’t the town fix ALL the sides streets instead of a chosen few and quit looking for ways to spend money on things that don’t need to be changed. Monroe St. and Madison Ct.  have been neglected for years. Some of the houses on Monroe St. are in the Historic District But it’s starting to look really bad with trash and over growth littering the yards. Maybe when the rats start getting bad they will do something about it.

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    Loudoun Business Journal - Summer 2014

    Loudoun Business Journal - Spring 2014