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MORE: The Confederate statue at Loudoun’s courthouse: Should it stay or go?

The Confederate statue in the center of Leesburg, the county seat of Loudoun. Times-Mirror Photo/Trevor Baratko
Scott York, the Loudoun County chairman of 15 years, says leave it be.

The Democrat hoping to replace him says take it down or locate it elsewhere. So too does the president of the local NAACP.

Public opinion may be on the chairman's side, but that's unlikely to quell the years-running dialogue on whether the monument honoring Confederate Civil War soldiers is appropriate standing in the center of Leesburg, the seat of the fastest-growing county in the South.

What's more, it apparently matters little what anyone thinks.

The statue is here to stay, statute dictates. Virginia code declares, “ … it shall be unlawful for the authorities of the locality, or any other person or persons, to disturb or interfere with any [memorials or monuments for war veterans] so erected, or to prevent its citizens from taking proper measures and exercising proper means for the protection, preservation and care of same. For purposes of this section, 'disturb or interfere with' includes removal of, damaging or defacing monuments or memorials … ”

Whether the monument remains for another day, another decade or another century, questions about its symbolism and significance are sure to persist.

The outcry over Confederate flags and statues comes amid a national dialogue about race, stemming from the June 17 shooting in South Carolina that left nine African-Americans dead in at the hands of a white gunman who opened fire in a church. The shooter has said he wanted to start a race war.

In South Carolina, Gov. Nikki Haley (R) has called for the removal of the Confederate flag that has long flown at the capitol, stirring outrage all the while.

The Leesburg statue features a roughly 10-foot-tall, mounted Confederate soldier holding a gun. It was erected in 1908 -- some say in memorial of Jefferson Davis and the “Lost Cause” -- and has remained standing for the past 107 years. According to Loudoun.gov, the monument “serves as a memorial to the many Rebel soldiers who died fighting for the cause in which they believed.”

“Loudoun County has a great deal of Civil War history,” said Chairman York, who is currently in office as a Republican but seeking re-election as an independent. “Like the other statues on the courthouse grounds, I feel it memorializes the soldiers from Loudoun who fought in these wars. To me, this statue recognizes those from Loudoun who fought in the Civil War."

York continued, "As it is a part of Loudoun history, I have no issue with the statue staying on the courthouse grounds."

Dana Shoaf, the editor of Civil War Times, wants to see the Leesburg monument and others like it used as teaching tools. Shoaf said he doesn't view the statue as an inherently offensive object, contrasting that with what he says has become of the Confederate battle flag. That symbol has essentially been hijacked by “White Supremacists,” Shoaf said, and he doesn't want to see that happen to monuments.

“It's a very challenging time to be someone like myself, who looks at the Civil War from a historical perspective,” Shoaf said. “I know this sounds like hyperbole, but where does it stop? Mt. Vernon had slaves … Williamsburg is a great place to visit … Slavery, unfortunately, was an intrinsic part of this country's history. We have to learn from it.”
Times-Mirror Photo/Trevor Baratko

Opponents of the highly public memorial say a history tied to racism, slavery and lynchings belongs in a war museum or possibly a battle site, not government property in front of a courthouse, a stark symbol for justice and equality.

Phillip Thompson, the Loudoun NAACP president, said the statue was erected at a time when racism prevailed and segregation was a way of life in Loudoun.

Commissioned by daughters of Confederate soldiers, the monument was constructed by renowned sculptor F.S. Sievers early in his career in 1908.
In 1908, more than 60 African-Americans were lynched across the U.S., according to the Library of Congress.

“The message of the statue at the time was, ‘this is who we are,’” Thompson told the Times-Mirror. “Well, this is not who we are now.”

Indeed, Loudoun is recognized today as a fast-growing, high-tech D.C. suburb of 350,000 residents rather than a small, agrarian-driven ecosystem. Traditionally a white community, Loudoun's population is now nearly 40 percent minority.

Leesburg resident Jeanine Salifou, an African-American, said she doesn’t find the statue as blatantly offensive as the Confederate flag. Looking out on Leesburg's historic King Street, which the Confederate's gun takes aim at, Salifou agrees the flag should be taken down in South Carolina and elsewhere, but she said she has never given much thought to the Leesburg statue.

Tom Medaglia, who has lived in Leesburg for more than 20 years, said he believes the statue should remain in place, and he drew a contrast between the statue and the Confederate battle flag.

“The statue represents a historical event. I don't mind that,” Medaglia, who is white, said June 24, while his wife and their dogs were passing by the statue. “But the flag continuing to fly above a state building, or a government building – it's time for those to come down. But anybody that wants to fly one on their own home, that's up to them. That's a First Amendment right.”

Phyllis Randall, the Democratic candidate for chair, told the Times-Mirror “symbols of the Confederacy should never be placed on public lands.”

“My objection about the Confederate flag, Confederate statue and a Confederate History Month are not new,” Randall, an African-American, said. “It did not take the tragic death of nine souls to crystallize my understanding that Confederate history should yes, be taught, but never celebrated.”

Independent chairman candidate Tom Bellanca said the real question is what the statue represents – a question to which he wasn't sure the answer.

"We live in a unique community that is diverse in some ways and not diverse in others … I think [the statue] has become a symbol for organizations like the NAACP of that underlying issue of racism,” Bellanca said. “It's a divisive issue. We don't need to be divisive. If the statue is a barrier, then, yes, it probably should go. However, the statue means a lot to some people, and it's important to a lot of people not to have a tyrannical government."

State-level politicians have been questioned about Virginia's Confederate heritage, as well.

On June 23, Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) initiated the process of removing the Confederate battle flag from specialty state license plates, but the next day said Confederate monuments do not need to taken down.

Attorney General Mark Herring (D), whose Leesburg residence is less than a mile from the statue, provided a similar sentiment to the governor's. Herring said monuments haven't taken on the same symbolism as the Confederate flag, which to him represents "oppression, intimidation and injustice."

"[Monuments] can help tell a story about a painful chapter in our past that we need to learn from," Herring said in a prepared statement. "I’d like us to tell a more complete story about our history in Loudoun and in our commonwealth, particularly the history of those who suffered under and fought against slavery and the systematic discrimination that followed it. We should also be mindful of the hard work still needed to erase the legacy of those eras, including a significant academic achievement gap, apparent inequities in the criminal justice system, and unequal access to education, housing and health care."

For some, like state Del. Randy Minchew (R-10th) and Shoaf, the statue is source of community pride.

Shoaf said the monument is “extremely well-executed and relatively silent,” and Minchew remarked the sculpture honors those who gave their life for what they believed in.

“Slavery is and was one of the most wretched and cruelest inventions of mankind ...,” Minchew said. “We in Virginia must be honest in our cognizance of our Civil War history, warts and all.”

He continued, “But, the Confederate soldier on the grounds of our Old Loudoun Courthouse commemorates the honored Civil War dead from our county and not the cause for which they fought.”


This story has been updated to include comments from Attorney General Mark Herring.


***



Original story: June 25

The president of Loudoun’s NAACP is reviving the call to remove a Confederate soldier statue from downtown Leesburg, the seat of the fastest-growing county in the South, while county Chairman Scott York believes the monument should remain in place.

Phillip Thompson, the leader of the local NAACP, the nation’s oldest Civil Rights organization, said Wednesday night “the time has come” to remove the statue from historic Leesburg.

“The message of the statue at the time [it was raised] was, ‘this is who we are,’” Thompson told the Times-Mirror. “Well, this is not who we are now.”

Thompson's comments come amid a national dialogue about race, stemming from the June 17 shooting in South Carolina that left nine African-Americans dead in at the hands of a white gunman who opened fire in a church.

In Leesburg, the statue features a roughly 12-foot-tall, mounted Confederate soldier holding a gun. It was erected in 1908 and has remained standing for the past 107 years. According to Loudoun.gov, the monument “serves as a memorial to the many Rebel soldiers who died fighting for the cause in which they believed.”

“Loudoun County has a great deal of Civil War history,” said Chairman York, who is currently in office as a Republican but seeking re-election as an independent. “Like the other statues on the courthouse grounds, I feel it memorializes the soldiers from Loudoun who fought in these wars. To me, this statue recognizes those from Loudoun who fought in the Civil War."

York continued, "As it is a part of Loudoun history, I have no issue with the statue staying on the courthouse grounds."

The debate over whether the Confederate statue in Leesburg is appropriate has been ongoing for years – similar to the contention over the Confederate battle flag on the grounds of South Carolina’s capitol.

The difference now -- as seems to be the case in the Palmetto State -- may be the cloud of tragedy hovering over the dialogue. The killer in last week's shooting at the Charleston church said he hoped to start a race war.

On Monday, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley (R) shocked many politicos in the state by calling for the flag to be removed, and the state legislature there has taken swift action to start the process of bringing it down. The governor in Alabama, meanwhile, has removed Confederate flags from his capitol's grounds.

All week, questions over flags, statues, history and symbolism have arisen. What's appropriate? What's offensive? What's heritage and of historical significance?

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) on Tuesday called for the state to stop producing Sons of Confederate Veterans license plates featuring the stars-and-bars logo. But McAuliffe followed up Wednesday by saying he doesn't believe all Confederate statues need to be removed.

Loudoun Democrat Phyllis Randall, the party's candidate for county chairman, told the Times-Mirror this morning she believes, like Thompson, the statue should be taken down. Randall has long held her view, she said, adding that she pushed for Gov. Bob McDonnell (R) in 2010 to halt Confederate History Month in Virginia.

“My objection about the Confederate flag, Confederate statue and a Confederate History Month are not new,” Randall, an African-American, told the Times-Mirror. “It did not take the tragic death of nine souls to crystallize my understanding that Confederate history should yes, be taught, but never celebrated. Symbols of the confederacy should never be placed on public lands or funded by tax payer dollars.”

Independent chairman candidate Tom Bellanca said he wasn't sure whether the statue should be displaced.

“What's important is, what's the real issue – I believe the issue is what the statue represents," Bellanca said. "We live in a unique community that is diverse in some ways and not diverse in others … I think [the statue] has become a symbol for organizations like the NAACP of that underlying issue of racism.”

Bellanca said he's interested in dealing with more substantive problems than whether the statue is removed. “It's a divisive issue," he said. "We don't need to be divisive. If the statue is a barrier, then, yes, it probably should go. However, the statue means a lot to some people, and it's important to a lot of people not to have a tyrannical government."

Republican candidate for chair Charles King gave a similar response, not directly saying whether the statue should stay or go.

"Debating the statue overlooks the problem," King said. "The better ways to address the problem of discrimination. There is strength in Loudoun's diversity."

Leesburg resident Jeanine Salifou, an African-American, said Wednesday night she doesn’t find the statue as blatantly offensive as the flag. Salifou said Wednesday she agrees the flag should be taken down in South Carolina and elsewhere, but she said she has never thought much about the Leesburg statue.

Tom Medaglia, who has lived in Leesburg for more than 20 years, said he believes the statue should remain in place, and he drew a contrast between the statue and the Confederate battle flag.

“The statue represents a historical event. I don't mind that,” Medaglia, who is white, said Wednesday night, while his wife and their dogs were walking by the statue. “But the flag continuing to fly above a state building, or a government building – it's time for those to come down. But anybody that wants to fly one on their own home, that's up to them. That's a First Amendment right.”

Monuments and historical Confederate markers have been under scrutiny all week. In Richmond Thursday morning, vandalism of a prominent Jefferson Davis statue appeared, donning the words, “Black Lives Matter.”

The conversation in Loudoun County has been relatively quiet given the prominent location of the statue. But that may well change this weekend. The Virginia Division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans will hold a “gathering of Confederate heritage supporters” at the statue Sunday at noon.

Comments


NEXT WEEKS AGENDA HOW TO DECONSTRUCT LODOUN COURT HOUSE . THIS BALONEY REMINDS ME OF THE MISHAP AT THE LOUDOUN COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL YEARS AGO WHEN A VERY FAMOUS STAR WAS OVERCOME WITH HATERED AND WACKED FROM THE BILLBOARD OUT IN FRONT OF THE SCHOOL THE CONFEDERATE FLAG OFF THE CONFEDERATE SOLIDERS WHOM DEPICTS RIDING A HORSES WITH THE FLAG RAISED HIGH AND AT THE END WAS LEFT ONLY HOLDING THE POLE ON WHICH IT WAS FLOWN FROM.IF I RECALL I BELEIVE HE USED A HATCHET HMMM SO LONG AGO. MY GOD I REALLY WONDER HOW MANY KNOW WHAT OLE JIM CROW WAS AND THE MEANING AND THAT THE WHITES AND BLACKS BOTH WORKED THE FEILDS AT ONE TIME AND ENCOUNTERED THE HARSH TREATMENT OF THE TASK MASTERS WHIP,AND EVERY RACE HAS HAD ITS TURN AND IS TODAY REELING THE TREATMENT IN OTHER COUNTRIES AS WE SPEAK.AS KIDS WE WOULD PLAY AROUND THE CONFEDERATE STATUE FROM TIME TO TIME AND WHITE AND BLACK TOGETHER HAVING FUN NEVER ONCE FEELING HATERED TOWARD ONE AND OTHER.THESE SPIN DOCTORS HAVE TO KEEP THE POT STIRRING THEY HAVE NOTHING BETTER TO DUE. NEXT THE AMERICAN FLAG WILL BECOME AN ISSUE AND AFTER THAT SOMETHING ELSE AND SOMETHING IS TILL YOU WILL BE REGULATED JUST TO WALK DOWN THE STREET.MAN HOW TIMES HAVE CHANGED.


Naziism is part of Germany’s history and heritage. Are there any statues of Hitler and Goebbels in Berlin or Munich?


Another display of manufactured outrage by the county that brought you “crucified skeleton Santa.”  The plain fact is that nobody is outraged by this statue, people have not been walking or driving by and fuming by the presence of a statue.  But there are the people who can conjure up outrage over anything, like the ruiners of our county holiday displays, who like small children have to ruin it for everyone when they don’t get their way.  Everyone is now caught up in the piling on to erase anything to do with the Civil War, thanks to the unconscionable actions of an ignorant, racist, drug-addled, dropout, KKK wannabee who perpetrated a hateful act on a peaceful congregation several states away.  What we have now isn’t a “national conversation” by any means; it is the suppression of our history by people who largely do not make any effort to understand that history, but have become ill-informed spokespeople for an idea they clearly cannot wrap their heads around except that it is today’s fast-food, disposable, attention getting, trumped up topic of the moment.  To be fair, the beginnings of the Civil War were right here in Leesburg, where the Union Army attempted to invade Virginia at Ball’s Bluff and were driven back into the Potomac.  Some of those soldiers listed on that monument fell defending Loudoun County from invaders and a federal government attempting to impose its will on states that were breaking away in full keeping with the Declaration of Independence and the US Constitution.  This solitary soldier pays tribute to the men who defended their homes, their neighbors, their rights, and their agrarian way of life.  We cannot use today’s morals, situation, and values to view history from over 100 years ago and expect to make any sense of it.  In fact, this “dialogue” should spur Loudoun and Leesburg to do more to teach about the period, about who these people are, and about why they went to war to fight and sometimes die.  It is not as simple as they were all racists and slavery supporters.  Anyone who believes that is feeble minded indeed.  I encourage the county to preserve the heritage of this area and do more to educate our citizens and our visitors.


@FromHereNotAComeHere, you can spin it anyway you want it still comes out slavery, lynching, Jim Crow, voter disenfranchisement.  It also comes out that there was no real opposition by the “average Joe” Southerner to any this, none.  Just today, poll comes out and 75 percent of white Southerners support the Stars and Bars, despite its infamous place in history.  So I again ask, what part of Southern Heritage does not include barbarism toward Black people?


@Lawman In a discussion about the Civil War, why would we, Virginia, honor “the side that won”?  You’re in Virginia, not Pennsylvania. 

You write, “The history books say that Heritage was full of venom and hate towards Black people” ...this is part of the problem.  History books are written by the victors, of course they are going to spin it in their favor.  Most Southerners did not have slaves, nor did all Southerners fight to preserve slavery, nor did all Southerners object to the Civil Rights movement but the history books and big media will have you believe that every Southerner had slaves, every Southerner hates Blacks, etc.  It’s nonsense and it’s not true. If Blacks were to honor their people and their heritage, I’m sure not all of it is positive but does that mean it’s not worth remembering? The same is true of our Southern Heritage: these are our ancestors, this is our history and it has helped shape our culture today…we are not 100% approving of all aspects of our past but when you take down our statues and flags, you’re taking down the good parts of us as well-regardless of what you’ve been taught in school and what you hear on CNN.

What are a people if they have not their history?


If you are going to honor the war dead, then try honoring the side that won and those who died on that side.  Also, where the monument to the slaves whose toil and labor made this county and the South what it is today.  As to @SWSWSW most white people are killed by white people too.  Most mass murders are white men.  White men make up the largest number of criminally insane.  So what’s your point.  If you going to be a racist, please try harder.  If that soldier represents the “South’s Heritage”, then the South itself needs to do some soul searching because the history books say that Heritage was full of venom and hate towards Black people and to date I have not seen the heart felt forgiveness those victims families in Charleston showed one of your son’s of the south.


@SWSWSW & @Shaking My Head: 100% correct.  This is Liberal Mob Mentality at work aka GroupThink.  “The same mob mentality that leads otherwise law-abiding people to hurl rocks at cops also leads otherwise intelligent people to refuse to believe anything they haven’t heard on NPR.”


Let’s deal with the real issues that exist and stop worrying about a statue. Everyone is barking up the wrong tree. Go listen to Andrew Young’s interview. “The problems we face don’t have anything to do with the flag,” Young said in an interview with WAGA-TV in Atlanta. “The fact is that 93 percent of the black people killed are killed by other black people. So if black lives matter, let us start believing that we matter.”


Best solution is to rebrand the stature as a memorial to all Loudoun residents who fought during those four years regardless of which side they represented. Loudoun supplied soldiers to both sides, sometimes within families. Honor all or none. It’s honoring the sacrifice of the soldiers, not the conflict.


The Statue isn’t going anywhere because the leftist don’t have the votes in the County Government. Case Closed.


Context matters. The statue was erected on May 28, 1908, during celebrations to mark the centennial of Jefferson Davis’ birth on June 3, and amid a renewed veneration of the “Lost Cause” across the South. The novel The Clansman: An Historical Romance of the Ku Klux Klan, was published in 1905 and its stage adaptation was performed for large audiences across the south in 1906 and 1907 (the 1915 film Birth of a Nation was based on The Clansman). Its main message, aimed at whites, was to maintain segregation and defy the 14th and 15th Amendments because blacks, when free, would become savage and violent. From 1900 to 1908, 607 blacks were lynched in the U.S. During those same years Jim Crow segregation in Virginia was expanded beyond education and marriage to include everyday accommodations. In 1908 virulent racism was being stoked and, to a large extent, rationalized by honoring, on public grounds, those who fought to defend the practice of enslaving human beings. These are the facts that must be acknowledged in any debate.


To @nrcbtm1, I believe you are wrong, the Civil War was totally about slavery:  That propaganda about State’s rights and all that other bull is a post war invention, try a little of the truth.

 


Hey Chris N, the fact that you are talking about the NAACP makes them relevant.


@mephisto you obviously were not paying attention to the recent debate regarding naming the school after John F. Ryan.  This statute was erected in 1908.  So what do you think was going on in Virginia the three to four years it took to proposed, finance and built this statute? Between 1900 and 1917 the greatest number of Jim Crow laws were being passed and implemented and right in the middle of that time period this statue is erected 43 years after the war, 43 years after the war.  Now @mephisto and others, including some of the members of the present School Board and Board of Supervisors who seem to believe that there some nebulous statute of limitations on hate; why do you really think that statute was erected at the seat of power in Loudoun, a County that had citizens fight on both sides and which was under Union control most of the war.  That statute represented the message being sent.  But one message I hope you and the other apologist get loud and clear, it does not in anyway represent the Leesburg and Loudoun County of today.  I leave you with one last question, when the United States beat Germany, did it allow any statues glorifying the Reich to stand.  What was the first thing we did when conquering Bagdad was pull down the statues of Saddam.  Why because monuments mean something, they constitute speech and for many Blacks and other minorities THAT STATUE at the Court House connotes that Justice is not here for all.


Right Honorable, ANYTHING can be treated with religious fervor by its adherents.

There is a fundamental human need to explain/control those things which are outside of each individual’s control, so that’s why some respond to a sick individual murdering people with a need to “sanitize” history—that’ll fix it, if you can’t play historic games apps on Apple products anymore!

JTHG is, for some, the religion of “ME” (at least in Loudoun, where it seems to be primarily protection and perks for a few places and lifestyle adherents—I’ve read the 990s, and I steam every time I see the schools promote their summer “camps”, at a cost of hundreds of dollars per participant, where the kids make videos that are used to lobby Congress for…more money for JTHG), but I mean it seriously:  Jefferson held slaves, and according to some fathered several children with one—did Sally Hemings HAVE a choice, in that relationship?  Gettysburg will now NOT have Confederate items in the gift shop—will we, at taxpayer expense, reconfigure that park as a pure testament to the North exterminating simple subhuman hatred, or will it actually be a monument to what HAPPENED, in HISTORY?

until we get it sorted out where this (I’m offended!) all ends, we have to consider that yes, even great big feel-goods like JTHG are suspect too.  If we’re going to be CONSISTENT (no guarantees there, of course : D )

All those trees, planted for evil slave-baiting haters!

Rip them up?

vandalize them with hashtags?

Stay tuned.


Like the idea of starting with Journey Through Hallowed Ground.

Rare to see a scam on this scale that doesn’t involve religion in some way….

Check out their Form 990 on guidestar.org


Sure, let’s get rid of it.  And while we’re at it, let’s demolish the Jefferson Memorial and Mount Vernon too…  Oh, and don’t forget the US Flag!  We are well along our way on that slippery slope.


This is Virginia, in case you forgot.  Here’s a refresher course for all of the transplants:  The Commonwealth seceded from the Union in 1861.  Richmond was the capital of the Confederacy.  Robert E. Lee (a Virginian) was the C.O. of the Army of Northern Virginia.  The statue in Leesburg is a monument to those men who fought and died defending themselves and defending Virginia.  The statue stays and everyone who is trying to change our history is free to move out of Virginia and carry on with their lives. You can’t change history just because you disagree with it.


The left wing Mayor of Chicago, Rahm Emmanuel, stated that you should never let a good crisis go to waste. In this case,the left exploited the maniac in South Carolina’s killing spree. Folks, this attack on southern heritage and tradition is nothing but an exploitation from the left. They have been trying for years to rid oour nation of this flag and tradition. Now with the Supreme Courts ruling on gay marriage we the people need to understand that elections do have consequences that can and will transform our nations fabric and traditions. This transformation is all occurring under the watchful eye of Obama and he is loving every minute of it. Thanks to all who voted for him. NOT!!!!


It would make more historical sense, if there was a Union soldier standing in front of the Rebel soldier.  That would portray the conflict from both divisive sides.  But, having only a Rebel soldier on the Courthouse lawn, suggests that the County government approves of, or maintains a spirit of dis-unity behind its iron gates.  Moving the statue to a non-judicial location (a park ?) might be a compromise.


If it ends up going, there will be a lot more that needs to go.

Starting with the Journey Through Hallowed Ground.

Everyone is on board with that, right?

I’m sorry, but this statue wasn’t on prescription antipsychotics, shooting peole two states south of here with an illegal gun.

Yes, I know when Mr. Miller was my supervisor, all he ever saw was a rebel pointing a gun at him—-while he was standing on the roof of the Stockman building?  #overpersonalised

Yes, it is an election year.

Yes, next year is a bigger election year.

No, this is a hot-button sidetrack.

If this goes, then make it consistent:  EVERY other Civil War thing in Loudoun, since 90+% of it is Confederate history.

And then NEVER make a peep again about the absolute necessity for historic preservation.

Not.  One.  word.


If it stays we need a memorial to the Union soldiers that liberated Loudoun county from the grip of slavery and treason.  A memorial to all the slaves that died in bondage in this county is also in order.


I have no white guilt over the actions of others many decades ago that can’t be traced back through my family genealogy in Tennessee. With that having been said, I have worked extensively in some of the worst neighborhoods that DC, Baltimore and Richmond have to offer (some other non-local cities too). I have been called pacman (movie colors), white boy, white bread, etc., so all this NAACP and other black racism needs to be discussed first before any movement can be made to address racism promoted by blacks. In the construction industry blacks hate most blacks and especially Latinos. Most Mexicans hate other non-Mexican Latinos and crews regularly fight when forced to work together. The same can be said with Asian crews as you can’t mix nationalities. It is sad, but plays a part of daily life that I have experienced firsthand for decades. The confederate flag means “I’m Southern and proud of it” to me, but I understand how others can be insulted as some people use it as a racist symbol. You will never stop racism, radical Islam, poverty and the sun from eventually dying off, so be prepared.


The Confederate Monument should stay.  Below is a partial listing of the sons of Loudoun County who served in the Confederate Army.  They fought in many epic battles such as Gettysburg.  They were apart of our national crisis and our defining moment in the nations history.  Some indeed were slave owners.  Many were farmers, laborers, merchants, and skilled artisans.  These men for the most part volunteered all though some were conscripted.  Some fought to preserve slavery, some fought to defend Loudoun from invasion and in the end they all fought for the brother next to them as all soldiers do.  These veterans lost.  And when it was over they took an Oath of Allegiance to the United States and became Americans again.  During Reconstruction these were the men who rebuilt Loudoun County.  Their sons and daughters became prominent citizens of the county in the 20th Century.  Let the monument stand to the Sons of Loudoun County who gave the last full measure and the best of themselves during the Civil War and after.

Abbott, Joseph A.  10/13/1834 - 12/19/1898 8th VA
Adams, Joseph A.  1846-1885 35th BN
Adams, Thomas W.  1836-1883 8th VA
Adrian, James A.  9/28/1838 - 5/14/1915 35th BN
Adrian, John M.  1840-1918 43rd BN
Aldridge, Robert M.  1845-1864*  35th BN
Alexander, John H.  9/23/1846 - 2/9/1909 43rd BN
Allder, Nathan 1829-1918 6th VA Cavalry
Ankers, W. S.  6/26/1835 - 2/15/1903 Loudoun Artillery
Armistead, Coles E.  1838-1916 6th VA Cavalry
Athey, William W.  8/15/1836 - 10/13/1905 17th VA
Atwell, Ewell B.  2/22/1837- 3/24/1898 43rd BN
Atwell, J. Jared 1843-1898 8th VA
Ayre, George S.  1817-1912 43rd BN
Ayre, William T.  1812-1863*  8th VA
Baker, Silas H.  1843-1861 8th VA
Ball, C. H.  1835-1864*  11th VA Cavalry
Ball, William E. —— 6th VA Cavalry
Ball, William M.  9/12/1836 -3/17/1907 8th VA
Barrett, William F.  2/20/1835 - 6/9/1885 35th BN
Beach, Andrew J.  1829-1900 8th VA
Beans, Aaron T.  1842-1916 8th VA
Beans, Amos 1847 - 3/4/1929 8th VA
Beans, William H.  1841-1915 35th BN
Beans, William H.  1820-1913 8th VA
Bell, Bruce 1842-1915 8th VA
Belt, George H.  1826-1904 8th VA
Benedum, James H.  1817-1871 Loudoun Artillery
Benedum, John E.  1844-1924 8th VA
Benjamin, William H.  1841-1893 Loudoun Artillery
Bennett, Edward L.  1842-1901 35th BN
Berkley, Charles F.  1833-1871 8th VA
Berkley, William F.  1826-1907 8th VA
Birkby, Charles R.  1820-1905 17th VA
Birkby, Charles T.  1841-1908 17th VA
Birkby, Collins T.  1838-1864*  35th VA Co. D
Birkby, John M.  1836-1864*  Loudoun Artillery
Bitzer, James H.  1817-1898 CSA
Boss, James P. —- 1863*  8th VA
Bradfield, A. J.  1836-1906 8th VA
Bradfield, Cornelius H.  1830-1886 17th VA
Brawner, John E.  1834-1901 8th VA
Brown, Albert O.  1842-1872 35th BN
Brown, Fielding 1826-1870 17th VA
Brown, James W.  1836-1895 8th VA
Burch, John L.  1832-1920 8th VA
Burch, Thomas 1/5/1819 - 2/14/1884 CSA
Burke, Richard S.  1839-1912 17th VA
Callahan, George W.  1836-1909 Chew’s Artillery
Calvert Joseph C.  1826-1892 8th VA
Carr, Peter Henry 1843-1922 6th VA Cavalry
Carr, Thomas E.  1835-1902 6th VA Cavalry
Carruthers, Wesley 1826-1904 Loudoun Artillery
Carter, B. F., Jr.  1846-1903 8th VA
Carter, Charles Shirley 1840-1922 17th VA
Carter, George 1838-1926 7th VA Cavalry
Carter, James W.  1838-1922 Loudoun Artillery
Carter, John W.  1843-1911 Chew’s Battery
Carter, Robert G.  1840-1873 6th VA Cavalry
Carter, Thomas A.  1840-1907 6th VA Cavalry
Caufman, Edward G.  1834-1907 8th VA
Chamblin, C. T.  1842-1872 8th VA
Chamblin, Henry W.  1836-1908 8th VA
Chamblin, John M.  1835-1911 35th BN
Chamblin, Richard C.  1/19/1837 - 1/1/1920 35th BN
Chamblin, William B.  1825-1910 8th VA
Chancellor, James M.  1814-1919 43rd BN
Chappelear, Goerge W.  1842-1922 8th VA
Chinn, Francis W.  1836-1914 8th VA
Chinn, John L.  1834-1889 8th VA
Clendening, William T.  1843-1889 35th BN
Cockran, William J.  1836-1908 17th VA
Cockrill, Samuel W.  1844-1926 3rd SC Cavalry
Colagett, Thomas H.  1839-1881 17th VA
Coleman, Philip 1838-1864*  17th VA
Conner, James W.  1836-1897 35th BN
Conrad, B. F. Dr.  1842-1882 6th VA Cavalry
Conrad, John W.  1825-1882 Loudoun Artillery
Copeland, James E.  1845-1937 35th BN
Copeland, Silas 1828-1863*  35th BN
Corbin, Daniel G.  1843-1912 8th VA
Costello, Thomas H,  1843-1916 1st VA Cavalry
Coughlin, Michael 1828-1897 17th VA
Craig, George W.  1841-1919 35th BN
Creel, Elijah C.  1835-1895 8th VA
Crissey, John S.  1845-1908 35th BN
Crossen, Samuel E.  1845-1915 43rd BN
Cruzen, Willliam T.  1831-1893 35th BN
Cummings, George T.  1840-1862*  8th VA
Curry, David H.  1841-1929 35th BN
Curry, William F.  1838-1870 35th BN
Dade, Lee M.  1845-1918 35th BN
Dailey, J. Thomas 1838-1914 17th VA
Davis, Benjamin 1841-1902 8th VA
Davis, Charles B.  1845-1933 35th BN
Davis, Richard T.  1830-1892 6th VA Cavalry
Davis, William 1846-1921 8th VA
Dawson, William F.  1837-1906 8th VA
Dear, J. W.  1845-1883 43rd BN
Divine, John A.  1843-1869 17th VA, Co. C - Srgt. Loudoun Guards
Dorrell, James A.  1837-1915 35th BN
Dove, John 1835-1904 35th BN
Dowdell, Thomas 1810-1871 1st VA Cavalry
Dowell, C. Frank 1834-1861*  35th BN
Dowell, Willilam F.  1835-1888 35th BN
Downs, Henry 1844-1893 35th BN
Doyle, John 1838-1906 8th VA
Drish, Edwin 1833-1864*  35th BN
Ellmore, John H.  1845-1906 Loudoun Artillery
Everhart, George F.  1842-1918 35th BN
Fleming, Cumberland 1836-1912 8th VA
Fleming, Joseph F.  1834-1913 6th VA Cavalry
Fletcher, Joshua C.  1841-1915 7th VA Cavalry
Fletcher, Robert 1939-1911 7th VA Cavalry
Fletcher. William F.  1841-1934 43rd BN
Fling, Sanford M.  1839-1920 8th VA
Follin, Arthur W.  1837-1861*  8th VA
Follin, Ira ——— 35th BN
Francis, Independence 1846-1865 8th VA
Francis, James M.  1840-1861 8th VA
Francis, Thomas J.  1838-1866 8th VA
Fred, Burr F.  1824-1892 43rd BN
Fred, Frank L.  1823-1916 43rd BN
Furr, John William 9/26/1845 - 9/7/1919 6th VA
Furr, William C.  1842-1861*  8th VA
Garnett, James M.  1840-1916 Stonwall’s Brigade
George, John 1843-1907 8th VA
Gibson, Edward C.  1839-1909 8th VA
Gibson, Gilbert B.  1842-1907 6th VA Cavalry
Gibson, Herman D. —- 1920 6th VA Cavalry
Gibson, John N.  1835-1889 6th VA Cavalry
Gibson, Joseph A.  1833-1907 6th VA Cavalry
Gieman, Jesse C.  1831-1912 7th VA Cavalry
Gill, William H.  1820-1887 8th VA
Glascock, Aquilla 1845-1865*  43rd BN
Glasscock, Thomas 1814-1895 7th VA Cavalry
Gochnauer, Pembrooke S.  1841-1919 8th VA
Gochnauer, Preston B.  1843-1938 8th VA
Gover, William C.  1824-1900 7th VA Cavalry
Green, Daniel H.  1835-1917 8th VA
Green, Francis M.  1823-1864 K. Spotts C. H. 
Green, George H.  1843-1829 8th VA
Green, John W.  1844-1919 43rd BN
Gregg, James W.  1829-1900 8th VA
Grimes, George W.  1845-1908 8th VA
Grimes, Joseph J.  1839-1922 11th VA Cavalry
Grubb, John C.  1843-1863*  35th BN
Grubb, Joseph M.  1839-1914 35th BN
Grubb, Richard B.  1837-1863*  35th BN
Grubb, Samuel 1841-1867 35th BN
Grubb, Thomas S..  1839-1864*  35th BN
Grubb, William 1838-1861*  6th VA Cavalry
Gulick, William F.  1841-1902 8th VA
Hammerly, John W.  1843-1911 35th BN
Hanes, George W.  1844-1915 8th VA
Hatcher, Daniel C.  1837-1912 7th VA Cavalry
Hatcher, T. C. H.  1839-1861*  8th VA
Heaton, Albert 1844-1864*  6th VA Cavalry
Hibbs, William 1817-1887 43rd BN
Hill, Joseph R.  1840-1928 8th VA
Hoge, George D.  1816-1918 6th VA Cavalry
Hough, Samuel W.  1847-1902 8th VA
Hough, Thomas E.  1843-1902 35th BN
Hummer, G. W. 1823-1917 8th VA
Hummer, John T.  1832-1917 6th VA Cavalry
Hunter, George W.  1813-1872 8th VA
Hutchison, Benjamin H.  1836-1914 8th VA
Hutchison, John 1840-1916 8th VA
Hutchison, John R.  1829-1895 8th VA
Hutchison, Ludwell 1840-1918 8th VA
Hutchison, T. Benton 1835-1890 8th VA
Hutchison, Westwood 1846-1933 39th VA
Iden, Abner 1829-1910 Loudoun Artillery
Jacobs, James W.  1842-1902 35th BN
James, Robert M.  1844-1892 8th VA
Janney, Joseph R.  1842-1911 8th VA
Jenkins, Norwall 1837-1887 8th VA
Jones, Robert F.  1839-1877 35th BN
Kendall, William 1829-1915 Loudoun Artillery
Kerfoot, William F.  1843-1890 8th VA
Kerrick, F. M.  1840-1902 Loudoun Artillery
Kidwell, James E.  1841-1915 8th VA
Kilgour, John M.  1822-1902 35th BN
Kinchloe, Conrad B. —— 8th VA
Kinchloe, Elisha 1837-1919 8th VA
Kinchloe, James M.  1836-1861 CSA
Kinchloe, John W.  1833-1912 7th VA Cavalry
Kindrick, William L. H.  1817-1894 VA Ligh Artillery
Lake, Bladen D.  1830-1862 7th VA Cavalry
Lay, Graven C.  1845-1933 35th BN
Laycock, John F.  1842-1927 8th VA
Lee, James 1836-1904 35th BN
Lefever, Samuel 1828-1904 Loudoun Artillery
Legg, James E.  1835-1915 43rd BN
Leith, B. F.  1841-1919 8th VA
Leith, Theodrick B.  1833-1896 6th VA Cavalry
Leslie, Samuel D.  1839-1902 17th VA
Lickey, William F.  1843-1922 8th VA
Lovelass, Harvey —— 18th VA
Lovett, Charles E.  1835-1907 8th VA
Lucius, R.C. —-  43rd BN
Luckett, Ludwell W.  1826-1891 8th VA
Luckett, William F.  1840-1917 8th VA
Lynchfield, Thomas W.  1842-1908 8th VA
Lynn, John T.  1823-1872 43rd BN
Mann, William J.  1843-1930 Richmond Howitzers
Marshall, R. A. M.  1828-1865 6th VA Cavalry
Martin, John W.  1824-1901 8th VA
Martz, Samuel T.  1830-1900 6th VA Cavalry
Matthews, Jonathan 1836-1916 8th VA
Matthews, Rodney 1842-1916 35th BN
McDaniel, James W.  1832-1892 35th BN
McFarland, William A.  1845-1925 35th BN
McIntosh, Jesse —1866 43rd BN
McVeigh, J. M.  1826-1904 8th VA
McVeigh, Robert H.  1826-1886 35th BN
Middleton, Humphrey 1845-1930 7th VA Cavalry
Middleton, John W.  1823-1893 7th VA Cavalry
Milhollen, Edwin A..  1842-1911 8th VA
Mitchell, John H.  1836-1902 7th VA Cavalry
Mobberly, John W.  1844-1865*  35th BN
Moffett, Thomas 1840-1913 35th BN
Moore, Alexander D.  1836-1914 8th VA
Moore, Henry R.  1839-1864*  35th BN
Moore, Lee Smith 1838-1902 8th VA
Moore, William 1844-1913 8th VA Loudoun Guards
Moran, A. F.  1840-1889 38th BN VA Artillery
Moran, Josh —— 8th VA
Mount, James M.  1837-1920 8th VA
Muse, James H.  1820-1897 7th VA Cavalry
Myers, C. L.  1827-1907 8th VA
Myers, Franklin M.  1840-1906 35th BN
Nichols, James W.  1828-1909 8th VA
Orrison, John W.  1828-1891 35th BN
Osburn, Fayette 1835-1862 8th VA
Osburn, Joseph C.  1842-1914 8th VA
Osburn, William 1815-1894 8th VA
Osburn, William T.  1841-1862*  8th VA
Pearson, J. C.  1828-1865 Loudoun Artillery
Phillips, A. Wallace 1830-1891 Loudoun Artillery
Phillips, Ambrose 1840-1913 8th VA
Pierce, Abner C.  1838-1906 8th VA
Pierce, James W.  1836-1863*  8th VA
Pierce, John A.  1829-1864*  Chew’s Artillery
Plaster, George Emory (Dr.)  1826 - 1925 6th VA Cavalry, Co. H, Capt. 
Potterfield, Thomas L.  1842-1916 7th VA Cavalry
Presgraves, John 1835-1863 8th VA
Presgraves, William T.  1841-1922 8th VA
Price, John H.  1839-1906 7th VA Cavalry
Purcell, Franklin 1837-1905 35th BN
Rawlings, J. Wesley 1835-1918 8th VA
Rector, Asa H.  1839-1911 7th VA Cavalry
Rector, Thomas B.  1840-1923 Blood’s 12th Artillery
Redman, Welford 1832-1919 6th VA Cavalry
Reed, John M.  1818-1876 6th VA
Rice, S. S. —— 9th VA Cavalry
Riticor, Robert A.  1845-1905 35th BN
Robinson, William H. —— 6th VA Cavalry
Rodiffer, Mark M. G.  1838-1928 Chew’s Battery
Rogers, Arthur L.  1831-1871 8th VA
Rogers, Hugh H.  1828-1899 8th VA
Rogers, John L.  1842-1880 8th VA
Rogers, S. Adin 1832-1864 8th VA
Rusell, James W. —— 8th VA
Settle, Thomas Lee 1836-1920 7th VA Cavalry
Shaffer, John 1837-1929 8th VA
Shanks, George P.  1843-1913 6th Alabana Inf., Co. M
Silcott, James E.  1841-1878 8th VA
Simpson, Thomas P.  1842-1926 35th BN
Sinclair, John H.  1833-1926 35th BN
Skinner, Charles E.  1840-1922 8th VA
Skinner, W. J.  1838-1901 7th VA Cavalry
Slater, George M.  1840-1923 43rd BN
Smallwood, William H.  1845-1864 43rd BN
Smith, James N.  1849-1918 35th BN
Smith, Sullivan 1833-1865 7th VA Cavalry
Snoots, William A.  1837-1897 35th BN
Spinks, Alfred J.  1843-1892 8th VA
Strother, James W.  1833-1918 12th VA Cavalry
Strother, John W.  1835-1916 6th VA Cavalry
Strother, Lewis 1839-1910 8th VA
Suanders, Hector A.  1834-1909 8th VA
Suanders, John H.  1832-1907 35th BN
Tavenner, Jonah 1838-1905 35th BN
Tavenner, Jonah 1814-1893 CSA
Taylor, B. Fenton 1830-1910 8th VA
Thompson, William Hugh 1843-1865 35th BN
Tillett, Samuel R.  1842-1909 8th VA
Tinsman, Francis M.  1839-1914 8th VA
Towson, Ames E. —— 17th VA
Tribby, John T.  1840-1925 35th BN
Triplett, B. Addison 1837-1929 43rd BN
Triplett, James W.  1836-1907 8th VA
Trussel, Howard 1833-1903 8th VA
Tyler, Edmund A.  1832-1911 8th VA
Tyler, Jonathan James 1831-1910 8th VA
Vandeventer, Isaac 1845-1865*  6th VA Cavalry
VanSickler, John B.  1844-1918 8th VA
VanSickler, Philip F. 1838-1913 8th VA
Walters, Columbus 1837-1911 8th VA
Warner Gabriel V.  1829-1909 8th VA
Washington, Robert W.  1839-1910 35th BN
Wenner, C. C. 1841-1933 35th BN
Whitaker, Robert 1827-1901 8th VA
White, Charles W.  1834-1895 8th VA
White, George W.  1838-1891 Loudoun Artillery
White, Joshua T.  1821-1899 35th BN
White, Josiah R.  1846-1923 35th BN
Wiley, George W.  1833-1907 8th VA
Wilson, Moses D.  ____ 8th VA
Wilson, William B.  1840-1876 Chew’s Battery
Woolf, Francis M.  1844-1910 43rd BN
Wortman, James 1831-1912 Loudoun Artillery
Wynkoop, Joseph T.  1840-1919 1st VA Cavalry
Yates, William W.  1842-1899 7th VA Cavalry


Whether the statue stays or goes, it is most assuredly a question of balance.  What this article does not say is that hundreds if not thousands of human beings were sold off as chattel at those Courthouse grounds and there is nothing there to commemorate their suffering.  That too is part of this history and history of those so-called young men for whom this statue supposedly honors fought to maintain.  I see some of the commenters want to bring up the NAACP, but, what their real problem is that the NAACP is challenging their romanticized ideal of this honorable South fighting for their rights.  No they were fighting for maintain a system of free labor that was keep in place by some of the harshest practices known to civilized human beings.  Stop kidding your self, the day to day soldiers may have been pawns, but, their cause was racist, barbaric and WRONG.  The right side won.


The statue should stay.  It recognizes the sacrifice of American’s and regardless of your support or defiance of their cause, they died for what they believed in, in the name of their country.  History cannot be erased, and neither should it be hidden.


The NAACP, both nationally and locally has been battling to regain relevancy for years. But this is the best they could do?


I think it should stay. Its part of Loudoun’s history and its a nice statue. Many Confederate soldiers died to defend Virginia. Removing it would not solve anything. That would be destructive. Please don’t take down this lovely statue.


The Confederate Battle flag first appeared over the SC State Capitol in the 1962…not hard to make the connection between emerging civil rights for all citizens and the brush back that flag’s raising represented.

The statue in Leesburg was erected in 1908. 

Let’s not take revisionist history too far.  What’s next, take down the Jefferson and Washington monuments because they operated forced labor camps (e.g., plantations with slaves)? 

And to the Sons of Confederate Veterans…if you don’t hold a vigil every Sunday your timing in this instance is disgusting.

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