Corbo/Savage/Sisson Q&A

From left, Denise Corbo, Kenya Savage and Julie Sisson

Three candidates – Denise Corbo, Kenya Savage and Julie Sisson – are hoping to serve as the at-large member of the Loudoun County School Board after this November's election. Incumbent Beth Huck is not seeking re-election.

Corbo, Savage and Sisson recently responded to a Times-Mirror questionnaire to give voters more insight into their platforms. Here are their responses.

***

Denise Corbo

What are your two top priorities to help improve Loudoun County Public Schools?

I am running for school board because educating our youth directly impacts their future and the future of our community, county, and nation. To provide every child with the education they deserve, board members must start with a vision, create structures to support that vision, provide transparency and be accountable to the public.

As the At-Large candidate, my first priority is to provide transparency and accountability. My slogan is, “A Voice for All,” because I plan to implement a method of communication where transparency and data become part of the board’s decision-making process. How can our school board make the best decisions for our children without allowing for employee and community input and data to drive their conclusions? We must actively reach out to those directly impacted by decisions and policies made by the board. When elected, I will create an innovative framework where the board actively solicits the input of all stakeholders through a simplified communication system allowing all Loudoun County citizens, employees and students an opportunity to voice their opinion on top issues such as, diversity, communication, technology, curriculum, mental health, school safety, the budget, education programs, etc.

The board must show accountability and provide citizens with data to prove there is a return on our investment. When we purchase and upgrade programs and tools, let’s make sure they are innovative, meet the needs of teachers and students, and show impact. Once purchased, there needs to be a model of evaluation and data collection that demonstrates collaboration with the key players and stake-holders. When elected, I will develop a method of evaluation, collaborative problem solving, and data to ensure we have a strong return on our investment and are constantly seeking ways to improve our work and practices.

The past school year was a controversial one, with roughly one LCPS employee arrested each month, a locker-room sexual assault at Tuscarora and a former student bringing a gun into school, to name just a few major issues. Do you think Loudoun County Public Schools could've done anything different to avoid some of these troubling incidents? If so, what?

Communication: As a school division we need to be accountable for what happens in our schools. Our leadership team needs to address, communicate, and explain the process or policy for addressing issues immediately to the public.

School Security: We need to improve our school safety methods and communicate practices and policy to the staff, parents, students, and community so each of us become actively aware and engaged in keeping our schools safe.

Proactive Initiatives: As a nation, we are experiencing a changing society. As a country we need to be proactively seeking ways to provide access and affordability to support the mental health of our society. As a county we need to invest in programs and personnel to support social-emotional learning (SEL).

The National Resilience Institute reports that "72 percent of children and youth will experience at least one Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE) before the age of 18." Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) are divided into three types, which are Abuse (physical, emotional, sexual), Neglect (physical, emotional), and Household Dysfunction (incarcerated relative, mental illness, domestic violence, substance abuse, divorce, deployed family member and loss of a parent).

These students come to school every day expected to learn, while dealing with overhanging issues that increase acting out. These issues prevent them from realizing their potential. SEL’s provide strategies to help our youth develop self-awareness, self-control, and interpersonal skills that are vital for school, work, and life success. Research shows children with strong social-emotional skills are better able to cope with everyday challenges and benefit academically and socially demonstrating an increase in problem-solving, self-discipline, impulse control, and emotion management.

Similarly, some parents have expressed that trust in the school system is lacking. What can a School Board representative do to help parents trust LCPS?

Communication and leading with integrity trust. If we fail to provide quick ongoing communication, transparency, and strong leadership, it leads to misinformation through social media and gossip. As a board member, I will establish easy access to information and make effective communication possible for parents and staff. When programs are working, I will take action. For example, in an effort to go paperless, the county launched an online platform, Parent-View, for communicating report cards rather than printing a parent copy. The technology department reported only 50% of parents have only accessed the program once or never during the entire school year, leaving half of our parents disconnected to their child’s progress. This system is not effective and the problem has not been addressed. As a 25-year LCSP veteran teacher and parent of 3 LCSP graduates I will continue to hold the trust of the community and provide weekly office hours, conduct town halls, have standing weekly communication with each board member and actively engage in schools to build trust and relationships with all stakeholders within the community.

What is something you feel the current School Board has done/is doing well? How can you carry that progress forward?

The current school board has worked to address special education and equity in schools through the Ad-Hoc committees. This action shows that the board acknowledges the need to investigate better practices and policies in these two areas. The board has only just begun to tap into addressing underlying issues in each committee. Addressing the needs of special education students and providing equity for all students is critical. In some cases, it can take up to three years to provide services for students in need. We need to streamline the identification process and provide early intervention and staff support as a top priority.

The key to providing equity to students is first bringing awareness and second providing early intervention to level the playing field. Programs need to include processes that allow all children the same opportunity for learning. I have already been actively addressing equity by providing a framework to help identify students in our underrepresented population. At one of our title one schools, the gifted identification rate went from 0 to 18. We have to do a better job with early intervention and providing opportunities for students to excel.

How can LCPS improve in the area of diversity and equity? What steps should the School Board take to acknowledge the rights, abilities, values and individuality of students of all backgrounds?

As the president and founder of a national nonprofit addressing literacy among our nation’s neediest children, I know firsthand the struggles schools have with addressing equity and diversity. First, we need to bring awareness to the challenges to our staff and community. We need to reach out and engage parents in all aspects of their child’s education. Programs take money and we need to establish business partnership to help fund programs to level the playing field. Engaging the entire community sends the message to our children that we are invested in you regardless of color, race, or income level. When we come together as a community, we embrace and respect our differences. Improving diversity and equity starts acknowledging there is a problem, educating the staff and the community and providing meaningful plan for change and accountability.

What is your vision of a well-rounded education? What level of importance do you believe extracurricular activities — athletics, arts, debate, etc. — play in the life of a student, and what can the School Board do to ensure those programs are successful?

Educating our youth directly impacts their future and the future of our communities, county, and nation. LCSB members must have a vision, create structures to support that vision, and be accountable to the public to support and provide every child with the education they deserve. A well-rounded education teaches life skills, not just answers for the test. It encourages students to branch out and push their limits rather than concentrating just academics. By developing various subject areas and extracurricular activities and skills, this allows students to keep all possibilities open for an unlimited future full of potential.

I believe we need to provide extracurricular activities and opportunities for all students. In elementary schools, many schools provide an out of pocket paid after school active opportunity and in middle schools there are limited opportunities. I think we need to invest in providing programs at all schools to engage students with high interest while learning skills.

What grade (A through F) would you give Superintendent Eric Williams? Do you have any concerns about his leadership?

I believe Dr. Williams is providing leadership to the board’s expectations.

Do you believe there are areas of the LCPS budget that should be cut? If so, what are they?

We need to cut:

  • Programs that do not show impact
  • Evaluation of programs and spending (unused consumable workbooks)
  • Establish business partnerships to offset program costs

Do you believe there are areas of the LCPS budget that should be increased? If so, what are they?

We need to provide increased funding to address the following:

  • Living wage for staff
  • Align sag in teacher pay
  • Early intervention and literacy support (by the end of 3rd grade 2/3 of students never catch up and 2/3 of incarcerated youth are illiterate or functionally illiterate.)
  • Technology training for teachers and students
  • Programs that make an impact and are relevant to our society and life

_________________

Kenya Savage

What are your two top priorities to help improve Loudoun County Public Schools?

My top two priorities to help improve Loudoun County Public Schools include governing without regard to political party agenda and keeping student learning and safety as the priority. Even before my initial run for School Board in 2015, I have always advocated for public education, spoken at School Board meeting for programs and services which allow our children to compete and have equitable opportunities across the county, and asked to contribute to focus groups across the county to help drive District teams, and our school administrators to become more relatable to individual family needs which impact learning. I decided in May, to not seek a political party endorsement. I said "NO" to towing a party line. I said "NO" to party affiliation because it was convenient. I said "NO" to excluding great ideas because of partisanship. And, more importantly, I said "NO" to further politicization of our school board -- having politics influence and drive policy decisions on K-12 education. On the contrary, I said "YES" to listening and being accountable to all Loudoun County constituents. I said "YES" to working collaboratively to design a more comprehensive architecture for our students, teachers and schools. I said "YES" to remaining steadfast in my commitment to serve and ensure all students have the opportunity and equitable access to close gaps and achieve their fullest academic potential. I said "YES" to understanding what our District needs to make our District world class. More importantly, I said "YES" to you and being your advocate!

Regarding school safety, a resounding theme while talking with voters is trust and communication. Families want to know when their son or daughter go off to school, the institution responsible for their learning also ensures their safety and protection. I have over 25 years working in the national security field, where timely communicate is paramount to ensure effective execution of mission needs and trust is commensurate with one’s ability to delivery results. I didn’t decide to run for our schools, our children, and our teachers a few months ago. I serve and seek to serve others, because I understand the reward is beyond myself.

The past school year was a controversial one, with roughly one LCPS employee arrested each month, a locker-room sexual assault at Tuscarora and a former student bringing a gun into school, to name just a few major issues. Do you think Loudoun County Public Schools could've done anything different to avoid some of these troubling incidents? If so, what?

The poor conduct and choices of some have caused significant doubt in our security posture and safety at our schools. This is very disheartening. As a District, it is overdue, and the time is now to overhaul and modernize existing service level agreements (SLAs) and Memorandums of Understandings (MOUs) with Local and Town Government offices to ensure a comprehensive communication and security plan is established and relevant. I am excited about the onboarding of our New Directors of Security and Communications. These are key Offices that require strong leadership and a no tolerance to practices and behaviors that put our children, our teachers, and our schools in danger or at risk. I will advocate for a Crisis Management System Policy and Office in collaboration with local Loudoun County emergency management offices. Getting timely communication out to our children’s family and advising of their student’s safety is key.

Similarly, some parents have expressed that trust in the school system is lacking. What can a School Board representative do to help parents trust LCPS?

Parents have lost trust because of the lack of accountability. Parents want to be included in, advised early of, and empowered to make the best choices and ensure equitable opportunities and access to allow children to achieve their greatest potential. When parents and community members see school board policies being set based on partisan agenda, the lens to equip all students to be global learners and make meaningful contributions to the world is distorted. Because I believe in the power of our students, teachers, and parents. I believe in inclusivity and, as a I said in 2015, I believe in being at the table instead of on the menu. There’s room for all of us. There’s room for all our voices. It does us no good being at the table and not producing the results we need for our District, a well-balanced selection for our students. With your support, I will do those things necessary to address the concerns of our students, parents, teachers, administrators, and community partners, I will listen. I will lead with integrity and ethics all the time, advocate for a greater District, and sustain relationships to ensure LCPS is incorporated as a priority in larger initiatives.

What is something you feel the current School Board has done/is doing well? How can you carry that progress forward?

Loudoun County Public School (LCPS) District will need to take bold steps and reassess their current disciplinary procedures to lower the rate of out of school suspensions and work with students and families to remove the negative impact these procedures have on Black, Hispanic and disability students. This means institutionalize strategies of mediation and counseling prior to introducing law enforcement or the courts into an otherwise better behavior managed situation. Many schools across the LCPS District have employed practices called PBIS, Positive Behavior Intervention and Strategies (PBIS). This Program has been identified as one of the best disciplinary tools used when necessary. The impact of doing nothing and maintaining the status quo inflates the school to prison pipeline (STP).

Efforts need to be taken to dismantle the pipeline and provide these children with hope, engaging community experiences, and interventions that underscore academic excellences and value. Otherwise these criminal records will carry them for the rest of their lives. The District’s collective efforts and commitment should include that the ability to maintain high quality of life and equitable opportunities for all students is achieved and to advocate for fair and equal disciplinary corrections.

How can LCPS improve in the area of diversity and equity? What steps should the School Board take to acknowledge the rights, abilities, values and individuality of students of all backgrounds?

Our School Board has the data. Our School Board has received countless annual reports, including the one I wrote when I chaired the Minority Student Achievement Advisory Committee (MSAAC); as well as, reports from the Special Education Advisory Committee (SEAC). These reports outline recommendations of what our District must do to improve, in policy, in the area of diversity and equity across all subgroups. The data is there and has been there for years. Read the reports and act. Ask, engage, and act on input from our diverse staff member, in age, race, gender, and abilities. An area highlighted in these reports is that opportunity gaps exist, mostly with African American and Hispanic students; as well as, Special Education Students, economically disadvantage, and English language learning students. While gaps can be subtle, opportunity gaps contribute to disproportionate factors. Having the access, knowing where to go for the access, or having the economic means to access are all factors that the District needs to be able to address when looking to prepare students for life and living beyond graduating from a LCPS High School. Students cannot reach their full potential if we limit their ability and access to various LCPS educational opportunities. No two students are alike. And, not all kids want to pursue higher education. Some students may choose career, or some may choose military services. Whichever they choose, our students deserve to be educated by a District that prepares them for life beyond our high school.

What is your vision of a well-rounded education? What level of importance do you believe extracurricular activities — athletics, arts, debate, etc. — play in the life of a student, and what can the School Board do to ensure those programs are successful?

My vision for a well-rounded education included all facets of school, community, industry, and government. Having School Board policies and planned programmatic resources available year over year to bring school, community, businesses/industry partners together to foster student learning, student experiences, and student opportunities empowers our District with sustainable economic development and investments growth. When our School District does well, Businesses watch and choose to build, create and invest in our county; which ultimately enables our students to compete on a global scale with other Districts in higher education, career, or military services endeavors.

What grade (A through F) would you give Superintendent Eric Williams? Do you have any concerns about his leadership?

An A. Over the years, I have continued to work with Dr. Williams and his leadership team to witness him becoming more confident in his role of Superintendent, especially with a school District population twice the size of his former District. With his new leadership team forming, it is even more critical to have greater accountability and transparency to regain and sustain students, teachers, and community’s confidence in all efforts in our schools. The mission and core beliefs set within our LCPS Strategic Framework are still very relevant. There is more work and I look forward to serving on our School Board to ensure governance and accountability is upheld, allowing our students to connect and relate to the world around them, and learning beyond the walls of a school building.

Do you believe there are areas of the LCPS budget that should be cut? If so, what are they?

There are always opportunities to create efficiencies, cost savings and reprioritize based on growth, services and programming needs. This is especially useful in efforts to grow and make greater use of our school-business partnerships. This approach could assist in lowering the per pupil cost. For the record, I do not support making any unilateral decision without appropriately assessing all facts considered to make an informed decision. I liken this to our students. Our students are often biologically assessed; rather than being appropriately assigned. Don’t rush to judgement or make any decisions based on personal biases. I look forward to working with other School Board members to set smart budgetary decisions going forward based on the needs, care and concerns of my voters. I am always willing to investigate and explore areas or new ideas and opportunities for efficiencies.

Do you believe there are areas of the LCPS budget that should be increased? If so, what are they?

Yes, in elementary school at Pinebrook Elementary we lost FLES, Foreign Language in Elementary Schools. A great program designed to ensure our students were keeping up with the Districts belief, ensuring our children can make meaningful contributions to the world. FLES allowed our students to develop high levels of proficiency in Spanish and to begin, at an early age, meaningful context for developing communication skills in Spanish. As diverse as our District, programs intentionally geared to build a foundation of global communication is very important. Likely, we need to reclaim more contracted specialist support in our schools for students with disabilities. I support this need. Over the years, services in this area has been cut. This is a critical skill needed for our students with unique learning abilities. I look forward to listening to and working with voters to set programming resources for our students and teachers to be successful.

_________________

Julie Sisson

What are your two top priorities to help improve Loudoun County Public Schools?

Nearly every improvement we want for our schools boils down one thing – money. Strengthening school safety, increasing classroom resources, improving services to SpEd and EL populations, broadening our course offerings and extra-curriculars, attracting and retaining effective teachers, addressing transportation issues … and the list goes on. If we are not being good stewards of our taxpayer dollars, if we aren’t insisting on accurate and complete financial information, if we are not open to creative solutions, we cannot hope to accomplish our goals.

My number one priority is to bring my skills as a CPA and business advisor to this position. I want to delve deep into where that $1.2B is being spent. I want to look at trends. I want to reduce waste. And I want to prioritize our students and our classrooms over bureaucracy and red tape.

As I always say, I don’t want to spend more; I want to spend better.

Going hand in hand with good financial stewardship is good communication, which includes being transparent and accountable. As a 15-year LCPS parent volunteer, too often I find myself asking Why is everything such a big secret? Why didn’t anyone seek input or feedback before making this decision? What is the logic behind that change? Or If they had just asked us, we could have told them …

Parents and teachers can often provide a perspective that others cannot. We must leverage that! I want to facilitate and encourage networking and collaboration among our schools to help our teachers and our parent organizations see what has worked elsewhere. I also want to institute a way for our stakeholders to provide honest feedback without fear of retaliation.

Good communication also helps build trust. I think LCPS and the School Board could stand to build a little more of that.

The past school year was a controversial one, with roughly one LCPS employee arrested each month, a locker-room sexual assault at Tuscarora and a former student bringing a gun into school, to name just a few major issues. Do you think Loudoun County Public Schools could've done anything different to avoid some of these troubling incidents? If so, what?

Though LCPS, as the largest employer in Loudoun, cannot entirely avoid personnel issues, there is always room to improve how they are handled. When I met with Dr. Williams, I asked him about the uptick in these incidents. He pointed to the implementation of a “Duty to Report” policy (as he did in the statement he released last November). While such a policy is a good start, to me this implies that these kinds of things have always happened but were perhaps kept quiet or not reported at all. That is clearly unacceptable.

Obviously, we want to prevent as many such situations as possible. Vetting of potential employees with background checks is already being done, but that only shows past behavior. Future problems are more difficult to predict. Should incidents like possession or being under the influence on school property occur, I feel that Staff should be held to the same zero tolerance standards that our students face.

Many of the incidents described above WERE preventable, though, particularly the security-related ones. I do think LCPS is trying to address some of the procedural loopholes that allowed these breaches to happen.

Beginning this year, visitors must now have a verifiable reason for being granted admission to our school buildings. I would assume this applies to “itinerant” LCPS employees, as well. That alone could likely have prevented the upskirting and gun toting incidents.

The newly hired Director of Safety & Security will no doubt be strengthening other procedures. But many of our safety measures require a human being to act (monitoring cameras, checking ID, restricting access, etc); and if PEOPLE are not following safety protocols, there will surely be additional problems.

We need regular training on security rules combined with consistent reinforcement and random testing, coupled with real consequences for noncompliance.

Similarly, some parents have expressed that trust in the school system is lacking. What can a School Board representative do to help parents trust LCPS?

The best way to build trust with parents is through (1) proactive communication, (2) transparency in decision-making, and (3) accountability when mistakes are made.

LCPS needs to be more proactive in their communication, particularly with the troubling incidents described above. In today’s electronic age and with the proliferation of social media, the news WILL get out. And if no information is forthcoming from LCPS, the Administration will look like they are hiding something – even if they are not. It is FAR better to have the truth issued promptly than to play “catch up” days after the fact. It builds trust and shows respect for the school community.

In addition, when mistakes are made, ownership goes a long way toward building trust. Last spring, the FCPS Superintendent did just that, issuing an apology for not taking responsibility for their seclusion and restraint issues and admitting that their data collection had been inadequate in this area. Many in our SpEd community took notice and hoped LCPS would follow suit.

We also need to have full-disclosure discussions in committee and board meetings so that parents have accurate and complete information to help them best advocate for their students.

What is something you feel the current School Board has done/is doing well? How can you carry that progress forward?

I think the School Board has been doing a good job of proactively keeping our policies current and incorporating new information where needed. One obvious example is the Discipline Committee’s work to update Policy 8240 (Alcohol, Drugs, Tobacco) to include vaping/juuling.

In addition, I was happy to see other committees working toward more high-level standardization across our school system.

Last year, the Discipline Committee proposed changes to both the Student Suspension policy and the Appeal and Hearings policy to help clarify what procedures should be followed by school personnel in particular situations. In addition, the Curriculum and Instruction Committee has been revising the homework, grading, assessment, and retake guidelines.

Implementing standardized policies across the board helps set clear expectations for both students and staff. In addition, it helps improve equity, which has been a central focus in recent months. Standardization could help prevent some of our schools from grading or disciplining more (or less) harshly than others, thereby creating an unfair advantage (or disadvantage) for certain communities or unwittingly boosting students from one high school over another in the hunt for college admissions.

I hope to continue that progress in order to address other issues such as grade inflation.

How can LCPS improve in the area of diversity and equity? What steps should the School Board take to acknowledge the rights, abilities, values and individuality of students of all backgrounds?

LCPS has grown into a very diverse school system. Our demographics now include large Asian (23%) and Hispanic (18%) communities. Nearly 20% of our students are identified as “economically disadvantaged,” 17% are English Language Learners, and 11% of our students have an IEP.

The Administration has been making strides lately in the areas of diversity and equity, and it is important to continue those efforts. One area in which we can improve is to encourage underrepresented portions of our student body to fully explore the opportunities available in our school system, whether that be STEM, fine arts, athletics, or other areas.

Often there are unseen factors that limit the potential involvement of these students – language barriers, physical, financial, and transportation constraints, cultural expectations – that we can help mitigate if we only know what they are. This goes back to proactive communication.

Successful outreach is also dependent upon the hiring of teachers and staff that represent those diverse communities. Studies suggest that children, particularly in the elementary grades, show both behavioral and academic gains when those of similar background are represented at their school.

Lastly, as I mentioned previously, standardized policies can help to mitigate discipline and grading inequities across our district, but we need to consider the impact of our budget choices, as well. Cutting transportation or increasing activity fees may inordinately affect certain segments of our population. That is not to say that equity should be the only concern, but it should at least be part of the conversation.

What is your vision of a well-rounded education? What level of importance do you believe extracurricular activities — athletics, arts, debate, etc. — play in the life of a student, and what can the School Board do to ensure those programs are successful?

I whole-heartedly believe that extracurricular activities are a critical part of student life and a requirement for a well-rounded education. Not only do they teach teamwork, leadership, and self-discipline, they provide enjoyment and enrichment in a way that academics cannot.

Aside from the obvious method of supporting such programs (funding), one way the School Board can ensure success is to have open and honest conversations with students, parents, and staff about their experiences and needs in these arenas BEFORE decisions that affect them are made.

As a musician, a parent of two LCPS Fine Arts students, and a long-time music and drama Booster leader, there is no way I should have found out “by accident” that the Curriculum & Instruction Committee was considering cuts to our middle school music programs last fall. Luckily, there was enough push-back that such cuts never materialized, but it opened my eyes to ideas that may be considered behind the scenes.

It all goes back to proactive communication and transparency in decision-making. If we are to provide the best opportunities possible for our students, we cannot make decisions in a vacuum – or worse, cultivate only the kind feedback that fits a decision we’ve already made.

What grade (A through F) would you give Superintendent Eric Williams? Do you have any concerns about his leadership?

Grade: C

My assessment of Dr. Williams is based on my personal perspective as a parent and my conversations with others.

LCPS is one of the top school systems in the state – people move here for the quality and variety of opportunities available, and Dr. Williams has been a part of that. He instituted staffing standards and other policies in an attempt to make operations more streamlined and predictable. I appreciate that.

However, in my opinion, I don’t think Dr. Williams is very transparent. While he is excellent at touting the accolades LCPS earns, he seems less willing to admit mistakes or answer tough questions.

Additional criticisms leveled at him by others I’ve spoken with include too much of a hyper-focus on STEM to the detriment of other areas, reduction/elimination of relevant PD and networking opportunities for staff, and a serious lack of concern for the Special Ed community.

Do you believe there are areas of the LCPS budget that should be cut? If so, what are they?

As a current “outsider” in the budget process, it is difficult (and potentially irresponsible) to cite specific items I would cut. However, at $1.2B+, there are almost certainly going to be areas of inefficiency and waste that need to be addressed. When we are spending money on rapidly changing items like technology, we need to weigh short-term benefits against long-term costs and our ability to maintain those items (e.g. promethium boards).

I will say that one of my main areas of concern is our administrative costs. Student enrollment levels should be the factor that primarily dictates our budget. Enrollment has grown by 40% (59.5k to 83.8k students) since 2009. During that same period, the number of non-school administrative FTEs has gone from 99.8 to 234 – a 134% increase. Our HQ is bursting at the seams, which also means more non-classroom costs down the line. It’s definitely something to watch.

Do you believe there are areas of the LCPS budget that should be increased? If so, what are they?

One of the biggest problems we are currently facing right now is in transportation.

The district is experiencing a major shortage in bus drivers. Consequently, just one week into the school year, students are facing late buses, extended bus rides, overcrowded vehicles, and long waits for buses to return for their second round of students. Many attribute this shortage to low pay and the previous cuts in health and retirement benefits.

In addition, bus transportation for field trips and extra-curricular activities like Marching Band have been severely reduced. And last spring, the School Board voted to remove bus transportation for our Thomas Jefferson students beginning Fall 2020.

Many parents don’t have the option of driving their students to school (equity); and if they do, additional drivers merely add to the traffic congestion and increase the environmental costs.

This is an area where a budget increase could be considered.

_______

(4) comments

Loudoun4Trump

Corbo - best qualified for the role....

DavisB

Kenya Savage gives Williams an A?? Another politician who has not been paying attention.

Savage4LCPS

DavisB, I also said, we have a lot of great successes within our School Division too, which continues to draw so many to Loudoun County. My proven work over the past 12 years, working across our county and within our schools, is not predicated on past missteps in communication and decisions made in recent months.

A politician, not at all. However, a savvy realist, an engaged mom, trusted community leader and a champion for all students, who understands that accountability is required at all levels and the measurement of effectiveness is not constantly looked upon as half empty. I look forward to continue working with our District teams, our schools, our community and most importantly our students on codifying fresh ideas in policy for every child, ensuring better accountability and restoring confidence in our District, honing in on areas for improvement in curriculum and instruction, discipline, and communication, and sharing best practices from our teachers to ensure we prepare every child for success. Perhaps we will meet one day.

DavisB

you gave Williams an A despite all the terrible things he has done to our county. Please talk to parents and teachers and students. They will tell you that how bad things are. I am not talking about missteps or recent communications problems. I am talking about significant, poor decisions, strategies that hurt more than help, and a continued effort to disconnect students from teachers. Things are not good all over and have not been since Williams was hired. If you think otherwise, you have not been paying attention.

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.